about the Aedes mosquito

View previous topic View next topic Go down

about the Aedes mosquito

Post by dean on Sun May 08, 2011 10:50 am

http://www.dengue.gov.sg/subject.asp?id=12

Under optimal conditions, the egg of an Aedes mosquito can hatch into a larva in less than a day. The larva then takes about four days to develop in a pupa, from which an adult mosquito will emerge after two days. Three days after the mosquito has bitten a person and taken in blood, it will lay eggs, and the cycle begins again.
Fast facts about the mosquito

† †Only the female aedes mosquito bites as it needs the protein in blood to develop its eggs.
† †The mosquito becomes infective approximately 7 days after it has bitten a person carrying the virus. This is the extrinsic incubation period, during which time the virus replicates in the mosquito and reaches the salivary glands.
† †Peak biting is at dawn and dusk.
† †The average lifespan of an Aedes mosquito in Nature is 2 weeks
† †The mosquito can lay eggs about 3 times in its lifetime, and about 100 eggs are produced each time.
† †The eggs can lie dormant in dry conditions for up to about 9 months, after which they can hatch if exposed to favourable conditions, i.e. water and food

I have read other timeframes for much of this but it is approximate.


Last edited by dean on Sun Aug 28, 2016 9:50 am; edited 2 times in total

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

range of aedes aegypti mosquito

Post by dean on Sun May 08, 2011 10:59 am

I have read tha range is as far as 400 meters The normal is 50-100 meters of the site of emergence. I assume they lay their eggs in the same place where they hatched when there are not many sites to lay eggs.

This mosquit has a adult life of 8 days to 2 weeks and up to one month some have reported..

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

new technologies

Post by dean on Sun May 08, 2011 11:28 am

Philipenes with new trap
http://oltrap.dost.gov.ph/?p=9

using sterile males.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tv6JsC2MQYI&feature=youtu.be

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

website dedicated to dengue outbreaks

Post by dean on Wed May 11, 2011 1:27 pm

http://woodshedenvironment.wordpress.com/

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: about the Aedes mosquito

Post by dean on Fri May 13, 2011 9:45 pm

Mosquito netting. Recently a person asked about netting for their bed. I do not know where to get them, butÖ We have basically not had one drop of rain in 9 months. The mosquito we have here is aedes aegypti it is the one that can carry dengue if there is an outbreak . It has some traits that should not allow it to be here, it needs moisture, its range is very short, 400 meters is a long range and the typical is 50-100 meters of the site of emergence. We can speculate generally they go back to this location in a desert with rain to lay the eggs. Lifespan as short as one week but average of 2 week. So you know the breeding location is nearby. In a desert where we have no rain for 9 months this rules out many locations that tropical areas have problems with. In general, refrigerator or air conditioner pans should be inspected. I am sure no one has run their ac for many moons. If someone has a water storage tank that is open this is a prime location, a neighbor who has a pool that is not maintained, any kind of birdbath, animal bowls, plant pots that are overflowed with water, construction sites where they fill barrels of water (these should be emptied about every 5 days) and the one that is the main culprit down here is septic and house vents. Take a walk around your neighborhood and find the construction barrels, septic vents, water tanks, house vents that are not screened off. Take a ladder and some metal screen and electrical wire with and close them off. If construction you will need to do this every 5 days till they are done. While doing this pay attention to where there are buckets, boats, kayaks, garbage cans, wheelbarrows, pots that do not drain, old tires and such so if we do get rain you can go empty those out. None of my neighbors locals or from the north have said no when I do this. If you do not have the ability or ladder to do this I can lend you my ladder or ask a local (Jose Luis) to do the inspection/work for you for a reasonable price. My guestimate is I can get him to do it for about 300 pesos if a small area. You will notice the difference in 1 week.

When people leave for the season, they should put plugs and covers on all sinks, drains including shower drains, anything that has a ďtrapĒ, and even put saran wrap over the toilet bowl and tank to seal it from evaporation. Turn all flower pots upside down or fill with sand, and have someone inspect after a rain. dean@la-ventana.com

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: about the Aedes mosquito

Post by dean on Mon Jun 03, 2013 10:10 am

http://cchealth.org/topics/west_nile/septic_tanks.php

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: about the Aedes mosquito

Post by dean on Sun Aug 31, 2014 11:20 am

feel free to print has translation, contact me for higher resolution as it does not show up completely on this site..†



dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

what attracts mosquitos

Post by dean on Mon Oct 27, 2014 9:44 pm

click the link...

http://www.ent.iastate.edu/dept/research/vandyk/hostseek.html

Mosquito Host-Seeking: a partial review

Preface: I began writing this review but never completed it and have no plans to do so. However, some people may find this information interesting. There are sections missing, and much is incomplete. What is incomplete? Well, there's still a lot of literature out there that offers additional information which may clarify or contradict the information presented here. References mentioned here can be found in the accompanying bibliography. -John VanDyk
Introduction
Willis (1947) used a dual-port olfactometer to show that Aedes aegypti and Anopheles quadrimaculatus were attracted to animal odor (human arm). Haddow (1942, listed in Willis 1947 and Laarman biblio) showed that unwashed naked children were more attractive to An. gambiae, An. funestus and An. pharoensis than naked children who had washed. Dirty clothes in a hut attracted more mosquitoes than an empty hut. Individual variation in attractiveness to mosquitoes was shown conclusively by Khan (1965), who was able to isolate 1 person very attractive and 3 people very unattractive to Ae. aegypti by observing both bloodfeeding and probing reponses. Acree (1968) attributed differences in attractivity to the amount of lactic acid produced by the subject. Males were more attractive than females (Rahm 1958, in Khan 1965) and babies are not very attractive compared with men (Muirhead-Thompson 1951, Freyvogel 1961; both in Khan 1965).

Attractants

Many substances have been tested as possible mosquito attractants. Rudolfs (1922) tested numerous substances using an apparatus with two chambers and a connecting glass tube. The following table shows a partial list of his results (only positive responses are included in the following table:

lactic acid
http://www.labdepotinc.com/p-55869-lactic-acid-1-0n.php
peptone water
http://www.neobits.com/hardy_diagnostics_c6570_peptone_water_criterion_p6132817.html?atc=gbs


Last edited by dean on Sun Aug 28, 2016 10:51 am; edited 1 time in total

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: about the Aedes mosquito

Post by dean on Sat Nov 08, 2014 10:24 pm




read that 60 degrees is the temp where they can not breed.
http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/myths-and-facts-about-dengue/1/327080.html


http://www.cdc.gov/dengue/epidemiology/index.html

Transmission of the Dengue Virus
Dengue is transmitted between people by the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, which are found throughout the world. Insects that transmit disease are vectors. Symptoms of infection usually begin 4 - 7 days after the mosquito bite and typically last 3 - 10 days. In order for transmission to occur the mosquito must feed on a person during a 5- day period when large amounts of virus are in the blood; this period usually begins a little before the person become symptomatic. Some people never have significant symptoms but can still infect mosquitoes. After entering the mosquito in the blood meal, the virus will require an additional 8-12 days incubation before it can then be transmitted to another human. The mosquito remains infected for the remainder of its life, which might be days or a few weeks.


dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: about the Aedes mosquito

Post by dean on Sat Aug 27, 2016 8:53 pm

life cycle of AE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tt93m52tKvg
2 day after getting blood lay eggs †have read 3 days too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4o1vv6XL_Us
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5k2SP566WeE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rvVG2ko7Eo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWW4DURmSCc


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0KaDZ6Zmuo
1 hour

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022191015002097

egg of AE 550-700 microns long, 150-180 microns wide,

http://www.denguevirusnet.com/life-cycle-of-aedes-aegypti.html
Egg
After taking a blood meal, female Aedes aegypti mosquitos produce on average 100 to 200 eggs per batch. The females can produce up to five batches of eggs during a lifetime. The number of eggs is dependent on the size of the bloodmeal. Eggs are laid on damp surfaces in areas likely to temporarily flood, such as tree holes and man-made containers like barrels, drums, jars, pots, buckets, flower vases, plant saucers, tanks, discarded bottles, tins, tyres, water cooler, etc. and a lot more places where rain-water collects or is stored. The female Aedes aegypti lays her eggs separately unlike most species. Not all eggs are laid at once, but they can be spread out over hours or days, depending on the availability of suitable substrates. Eggs will most often be placed at varying distances above the water line. The female mosquito will not lay the entire clutch at a single site, but rather spread out the eggs over several sites.

The eggs of Aedes aegypti are smooth, long, ovoid shaped, and roughly one millimeter long. When first laid, eggs appear white but within minutes turn a shiny black. In warm climates eggs may develop in as little as two days, whereas in cooler temperate climates, development can take up to a week. Laid eggs can survive for very long periods in a dry state, often for more than a year. However, they hatch immediately once submerged in water. This makes the control of the dengue virus mosquito very difficult.

Larvae
After hatching of the eggs, the larvae (see figure 2) feed on organic particulate matter in the water, such as algae and other microscopic organisms. Most of the larval stage is spent at the water's surface, although they will swim to the bottom of the container if disturbed or when feeding. Larvae are often found around the home in puddles, tires, or within any object holding water. Larval development is temperature dependent. The larvae pass through four instars, spending a short amount of time in the first three, and up to three days in the fourth instar. Fourth instar larvae are approximately eight millimeters long. Males develop faster than females, so males generally pupate earlier. If temperatures are cool, Aedes aegypti can remain in the larval stage for months so long as the water supply is sufficient.

Pupae
After the fourth instar, the larvae enters the pupal stage (figure 3). Mosquito pupae are mobile and respond to stimuli. Pupae do not feed and take approximately two days to develop. Adults emerge by ingesting air to expand the abdomen thus splitting open the pupal case and emerge head first.

repelent testing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaJeg3f8jFk


size
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/002219109090118Y
http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1603/0022-2585-41.4.634?journalCode=ment
Aedes aegypti larvae and pupae in Iquitos, Peru, and compared these with the size of resulting adult females. During 22 May to 20 July 2000, immature mosquitoes were collected from 12,722 containers in 2,931 houses, of which 424 held ≥1 Ae. aegypti. A subsample of larvae and all 16,433 pupae detected was removed for study. Resting adult mosquitoes were also collected from the same houses as the immatures. Adult mosquito size was determined by measuring the wing lengths of 672 aspirated adults and 2,316 adult females that emerged from container-derived pupae. Immatures were most commonly found in rain-filled containers, located outside of houses, and without lids. The average wing length of females derived from pupae varied considerably (1.67Ė3.83 mm), with slightly less variation for females captured as adults (1.80Ė3.23 mm)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3748492/
4-7mm in size

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: about the Aedes mosquito

Post by dean on Tue Aug 30, 2016 5:45 pm

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0035920338901014

Abstract

A method is described of comparing the attractiveness of different coloured cloths as alighting surfaces for mosquitoes when about to feed. The mosquito used was AŽdes aegypti. It showed a preference for surfaces with a low reflection factor, especially Black. Red was more attractive than several colours with a lower reflection factor. Blue was more repellent than several colours with a higher reflection factor. Light Yellowish Khaki was the most repellent colour. Yellow was also strongly repellent. The mosquitoes were not prevented from alighting by a repellent colour, but the number doing so was reduced. When no attractive colour was present the reduction was small.
Statistical analyses of the results showed that most of the differences were significant, and demonstrated conclusively that this mosquito has colour vision and a colour preference as mentioned above. Further work is necessary before any detailed statement can be made about the type of colour vision possessed by this insect.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: about the Aedes mosquito

Post by dean on Tue Aug 30, 2016 6:39 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lethal_ovitrap


https://www.jstor.org/stable/1539832?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents



http://jeb.biologists.org/content/jexbio/33/3/478.full.pdf
THE BEHAVIOUR OF THE FEMALE MOSQUITO IN
SELECTING WATER FOR OVIPOSITION

SUMMARY
1. Egg-laying Culex molestus and Aides aegypti were able to discriminate between
solutions of NaCl ranging from o (distilled water) to 0-136 M. Significantly fewer
eggs were laid in solutions above 0-085 M-
2. Similar series of solutions of KC1, MgClj and Naj;SO4 showed a similar
distribution of eggs, but mosquitoes were apparently unable to distinguish between
MgSO4 solutions below 0-144 M.
3. Results from all these salts were related to the osmotic pressures produced,
but experiments in which isotonic solutions of glucose and NaCl were offered
simultaneously showed that osmotic pressure was not a critical factor.
4. Experiments were carried out to locate the sensory areas responsible for
discrimination. The possibility that drinking might be associated with the choice
of a solution for egg-laying was investigated by removing the proboscis; operated
insects were still able to detect differences in concentration. Covering or removing
various regions of the legs revealed that the chemoreceptors concerned were
distributed on all the tarsi; indications that they may also be found on the tibiae
were obtained.


dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: about the Aedes mosquito

Post by dean on Thu Sep 01, 2016 7:24 pm

here is the bible on them....

Aedes aegypti: the yellow fever mosquito
https://books.google.com.mx/books?id=TBcf5DTKL1oC&dq=subject:%22Aedes+aegypti%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjXqbf6we_OAhXHOCYKHeDqCTUQ6AEIITAB

AŽdes Aegypti (L.) The Yellow Fever Mosquito: Its Life History, Bionomics and Structure

Front Cover
S. R. Christophers
Cambridge University Press, Jan 3, 1960 - Science - 752 pages
0 Reviews

AŽdes Aegypti, the yellow fever mosquito, is widely used as a laboratory type for research on the bionomics, structure and physiology of the mosquito and for many other research purposes, such as in the testing of insecticides, research on essential food requirements and genetical studies. The book brings together in a systematic way all that is known about this species. It presents, in a readily usable form, information scattered in a vast and diffuse literature and adds much from the author's own work. The scope of the book covers: the history of early research, a review of the species systematics, its distribution, natural enemies and parasites, its relation to disease and the measures taken in its control.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?index=books&linkCode=qs&keywords=9780521113021


dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: about the Aedes mosquito

Post by Sponsored content Today at 7:12 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum