Bee, jellyfish, Man-o-war, stings ant bites, plants, urchin

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Re: Bee, jellyfish, Man-o-war, stings ant bites, plants, urchin

Post by dean on Mon May 28, 2018 10:29 am

I gave some Benadryl spray to the Guadalupe the ambulance driver yesterday so head to her if you do not have any...

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Re: Bee, jellyfish, Man-o-war, stings ant bites, plants, urchin

Post by dean on Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:10 pm

I can tell you this works for stingrays, man-o-wars, jellyfish, bees, ants, spiders, scorpion bites. I have tested it on all the forementioned and had a local doctor even do the same for a person with massive man-o-war stings. I put this on a scorpion sting I received and in 5 minutes pain gone and zero after effects. I am allergic to bees and same I use to have to go to the doctor but this if applied within 30 minutes works great ans in the case of a bee I do not have a week of itching. A friend got stung in the foot by a scorpion and the doctor was not in so she called me and came over late at night because her lips were swelling and pains shooting all up her body. She should have come to me right away, but she was 30 minutes into it and in 15 minutes she knew she was getting better if she would have come right over you know it in 5 minutes. She was ready for the drive to LaPaz to the hospital, and with a few sprays, not needed.

A friend was hit by a stingray and the kids told him I have the cure and he came upto my place in so much pain, and I put it on and within 15 minutes he knew it was getting better and a half hour later he said if i hadn't asked he would not have known. Kids getting hit by jellyfish with hands all red come up and I tell them 5 minutes and sure enough, they are fine and they even return to the water... From full bore crying to back to the water...

Well, what is it, it is a histamine blocker... Benadryl gel or liquid topical spray... It is amazing... I have not seen it for sale in Baja Sur. Have your friends bring some down, you will not be disappointed. Has been used on over 40 people by me directly without a failure. And I use to take the oral as recommended by a doctor for bee stings and this is much more effective.

BTW I have read that for pets it is recommended for rattlesnake bites. Not sure as rattlesnake poison is not a histamine attack mechanism. But they say put it on while taking for emergency care.


I use both gel and spray. and both do the job. I apply liberally to the area. Believe me the more it hurts the more you put on. The scorpion between my toes, well it felt like initially, I thought I stepped on a piece of sharp glass that was like a needle. Then the pain kept shooting further so I knew it was not glass. It was like someone was pushing the needle further and further.

the sprays work great too. also note, I have read that vets use Benadryl oral for dogs bit by rattlesnakes. From my experience when I take the oral vs the topical gel, i would use the topical gel right away on the dog and or myself as a back up. Though rattlesnake poison is a completely different toxin than bug ones from what I have read, but the fact is i have read at least some vets use Benadryl. What would you have to lose, as rattlesnake anti-venom is if available maybe only in cabo hours away.

As a side note when a local person got his with a scorpion in the foot, she went to the local doctor at 10 pm at night and he was not there. She went because her pain was shooting all the way up her body and her lips were getting numb. She called me and asked if I had the gel and came right over. She was on the phone with her sister-in-law who is a doctor as I put the gel on and the sister in law was saying with lips numb time for hospital if this did not work. and in 5 minutes she could tell it was working the shooting pain was starting to drop and in 15 minutes the lips were no longer numb and in 30 minutes she knew she was fine. If she would have had the spray and hit it fast it is only 5 minutes and fine.

worked on stingray, scorpions, bee stings, ants, misc whatever bugs, man-o-wars, jellyfish on over 20 people I used it on and for me. in general if I get stung by a bee I have to see a doctor till I started using this as long as I put it on soon. And if I saw a doctor for shots it was general 30 minutes to an hour and after the shots, there would still be swelling and it would itch for days after. If I get the Benadryl spray on it fast no swelling at all. I myself went into respiratory arrest from man-o-war stings under my armpit within minutes, and made it home and sprayed and within 5 minutes knew I was fine. Have used it on man-o-war for myself about 5 times.

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Re: Bee, jellyfish, Man-o-war, stings ant bites, plants, urchin

Post by dean on Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:27 pm

facebook
facebook wrote:I've been stung a couple of times by Physalia utriculus, the bluebottle, or Portuguese man-o-war.
Unlike other jellyfish, the venom is NOT treatable with urine, ammonia, acid, etc.
The Benadryl would help, as will fast working opiates for the pain.
These jellyfish feel as though you got a sudden electric shock, and then a searing pain begins.
A bad sting on your ankle will travel to the lymph nodes near your crotch, causing tough men to curl up with pain.
Women too.
The nice thing is that the severe pain fades in 20-30 minutes.

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Re: Bee, jellyfish, Man-o-war, stings ant bites, plants, urchin

Post by dean on Fri Oct 16, 2015 3:52 pm

I was stung by a scorpion a few months ago.    It was like a sharp needle was in my nerve endings.    It took me about 1 minute to realize what happened.     And I went for the topical benadryl.  So within 2 minutes had it on and then put a few coats on as it hurt a lot.    It was between the toes.     In about 5 minutes I could tell it was going to be OK.  And in about 15 minutes I was fine.    And 30 minutes did not even know I had been hit.

Also a few weeks ago this young lady was here and she had some serious welts from mosquitoes that she got in LaPaz and we had some mosquitoes around here.    So when she got bit we tried the benadryl and sure enough it stopped her itching.   She was from the UK and travels a lot, she will now carry topical benadryl with her to new locations.

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tested scorpion sting now

Post by dean on Tue Aug 19, 2014 8:16 am

Topical Benadryl sprays that are not available in Mexico now tested  on a Scorpion sting and similar results resulted, it quickly 5 minutes made the sting area non-existent vs painful and throbbing.   Though the person was stung on the foot, they got to me late, they called me from the health clinic which was closed.   So they had pains up the leg and foot in major pain.    again after 5 minutes the foot was fine, still had some pain up the leg but decreased and the lips had a tingling feeling later.  We only prayed the foot.   I think if sprayed initially vs 20 minutes later the secondary sensations may have been suppressed.    

So to date tested on portuguese man of wars and jelly fish many times and different people working 100% of the time within 5 minutes.    Bees  several times, ants several times, various spider and not known bug bites several times.  and a sting ray which is the most painful tested one time and was very effective.

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book, All Stings Considered: First Aid and Medical Treatment

Post by dean on Tue Jul 30, 2013 4:00 pm

http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-524-9780824819002.aspx

All Stings Considered: First Aid and Medical Treatment of Hawaii's Marine Injuries


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Re: Bee, jellyfish, Man-o-war, stings ant bites, plants, urchin

Post by dean on Mon Apr 08, 2013 10:09 pm

other things Benadryl has worked for are misc bug bites, including spider and the ant ones.

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works on stingray sting

Post by dean on Sun May 13, 2012 12:30 pm

Stops the Sting of a Stingray pain. Well finally had a chance to test the Benadryl spray in a stingray hit. A friend was down in the south bay and got hit and he came up to my place because he was told I have the spray that could help. His foot had the cut and he was in severe pain. He had significant redness and swelling about 3 inches square and puffed up about ¼ inch. We sprayed the area and in about 3-4 minutes he said it was amazing it was down to 10% of the pain and in 15 minutes when I asked he said if I hadn’t of asked he would not have remembered he got hit. His swelling and redness was also gone in 30 minutes.

And once again have used this again on a 4 year old a week ago who got hit by a jelly fish and he was in full 4 yo crying and in about 2 minutes he was fine and since he does not speak English gave me the universal thumbs up… And was willing to go back in the water. Other proven applications on me is man-of-wars that I can get a severe allergic reaction from, and bees that I also can have a bad reaction from. Helped me from ant bites and spider bites too.






a newer portable one...


online order at http://www.drugstore.com/benadryl-itch-relief-spray-extra-strength/qxp13134

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Sea Urchin spine treatment

Post by dean on Mon Nov 21, 2011 4:45 pm

http://www.wikihow.com/Treat-a-Sea-Urchin-Sting

Good advice; but, being from Hawai'i where stepping on sea urchins ('wana) is common, I've found that a quick soak in undiluted white vinegar will do the trick quickly - no need to muck about with towels and the like unless the spines are in an area that make soaking problematic. Simply pour some vinegar into a suitable container and place the affected foot/hand/elbow/body part in the vinegar for as long as you can - I've actually watched spines "dissolve" as a foot soaked in vinegar from obvious spine, to black pinpoint discoloration, to nothing. A good wash with some anti-bacterial soap and/or an application of antibiotic cream or ointment to the area after soaking is a good idea as well. As always, keep an eye on the site of injury for a few days after the incident to make sure no infection sets in.

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Re: Bee, jellyfish, Man-o-war, stings ant bites, plants, urchin

Post by dean on Thu Sep 01, 2011 5:44 pm

dean wrote:Benadryl Spray,
I purchased it for bee sting allergic reactions in hopes I would not have to take the oral pills which knock me out. and it works great... I can spray locally and i am just fine it stops me from going into serious stages.

Next i have allergic reactions to jellyfish and man-o-wars. and my former treatment was to take the oral and get knocked out for 8 hours. So I decided to try this and to my amazement in 5 minutes the pain and the marks are basically gone.

I have used this on kids after jellyfish hit them and they are crying so severely and within 2-4 minutes they are not in any pain and in 5 minutes they head back to the water. I have given some to a local emergency doctor and she has had similar results. this product needs to be a staple for life guards and ambulances and people who live at beaches... I keep mine outside and make sure people know where it is...

I gave some to the local health clinic if you need help.

remember to bring some down for your medicine assortment... it is amazing on how effective it is. this is a spray not cream, the spray gel one is also very good.
saw it for sale at "smart and final" in california the other day

this year I have used it on several bee stings and it worked great. also i had a reaction to an ant bite, and same thing it worked great. Had another insect bite that I believe to be a spider that was getting bad and it stopped the pain and irritation in minutes. none of these required furthur treatment, and generally they can be a problem for me.

I would try it on scorpion stinks and see if it works. but hope I do not need to. same with sting rays, i think it would be worth trying. if anyone does please post or tell me so i can post.

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New treatment for scorpion stings

Post by dean on Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:26 am



note the below I have now tested Benadryl to work very effectively on three scorpion stings, mine and a childs i put on within 5 minutes and we were fine in 5 minutes to 15 minutes like we were not hit. A person 30 minutes later with severe pain all the way up the body and lips numb it took longer but they knew they were getting better within 5 minutes and in 30 minutes no severe symptoms present, but still some pain. So again apply it fast.

bpe

New treatment for scorpion stings
The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first treatment especially for the Centruroides scorpion- the nasty critter from the southwest.
    The new treatment - called Anascorp- was fast-tracked because there simply wasn't adequate treatment available before its arrival. According to Karen Midthun, M.D. in charge of the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Anascorp provides "a new treatment for children and adults, designed specifically for scorpion stings." In infants and children, Dr. Midthun says, "scorpion stings can be fatal."
    Severe stings can trigger loss of muscle control, convulsions, and breathing difficulties that had previously required deep sedation and intensive hospital care. It was tested, fittingly, in Arizona in 2004 and found to be effective in treating the stings of the bark scorpion. Also known as the Arizona bark scorpion, it's the most poisonous scorpion in the U.S.
    The results were certainly encouraging. Children with extreme reactions normally faced lengthy stays in intensive care. When treated with Anascorp, researchers found patient symptoms disappeared after a few hours in the emergency room, no hospital stay required.
    The best way to minimize the chances of getting stung is to know where to be on the alert for scorpions. They're attracted to dark, moist places. That means you should be careful around rocks, wood, loose tree barks, or other stuff laying on the ground that could provide a cool, moist hideout. Landscapers are particularly at risk for scorpions, along with hornets, bumblebees, snakes and most of the other nasties of summer.
    If you're unlucky enough to have an unfortunate encounter with one, here are some simple things you can do: clean the site with soap and water, apply a cool compress, elevate the affected limb to the same level as your heart, and take aspirin or acetaminophen as needed for mild discomfort.
    As with any sting, be especially aware of any sort of breathing difficulty. If there's any question about breathing, don't risk it - head to a medical facility immediately.


Last edited by dean on Mon May 28, 2018 10:27 am; edited 1 time in total

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dangerous plants

Post by dean on Fri Jun 24, 2011 10:21 pm

BPE
dangerous plants

I want to let everyone know about the dangers of a plant that is common in many yards...based on my first hand experience. Pencil Euphorbia, (Euphorbia tirucallii), known locally as Dados de Ninos, is highly toxic.
E. tirucallii - the well known Pencil Euphorbia - A most dangerous Euphorbia and one of the most readily available plants, even in supermarkets. Latex from this plant has been the cause of death, blindness and severe illness. The latex produces excruciating pain and severe inflammation if it gets into a cut on the skin or on to the eyeball. It produces a more intense irritation of the eyeball than of the skin which may result in ulcerations on the eyeball.
I gingerly handled this plant, never even touching the sap (latex), and later touched my face and rubbed my eye. Even with the limited contact with the plant, I had a terrible reaction. The burning in my eye was so excruciating I thought I might lose my eyesight. My husband rushed me to the Amerimed Clinic in Los Barriles where they flushed my eye until they could identify the plant. With the help of Lynn Mirassou and Betsy O'Leary enough information was gathered so that Dr Rendon could contact an ophthalmologist in La Paz for the appropriate treatment. I am very grateful for this team effort. Thankfully the treatment was successful and I am recovering.
I had no idea that this plant is so toxic. If you have this plant in your garden, please handle it carefully, avoid the milky sap, wash your hands after contact, and make certain that children do not touch it. Many people place this plant in front of their home on the street. Now I know why the cows won't eat it.
Holly Burgin burgin.holly@gmail.com

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Benadryl Spray,,, buy it works great

Post by dean on Wed Jun 08, 2011 9:49 pm

Benadryl Spray,
I purchased it for bee sting allergic reactions in hopes I would not have to take the oral pills which knock me out. and it works great... I can spray locally and i am just fine it stops me from going into serious stages.

Next i have allergic reactions to jellyfish and man-o-wars. and my former treatment was to take the oral and get knocked out for 8 hours. So I decided to try this and to my amazement in 5 minutes the pain and the marks are basically gone.

I have used this on kids after jellyfish hit them and they are crying so severely and within 2-4 minutes they are not in any pain and in 5 minutes they head back to the water. I have given some to a local emergency doctor and she has had similar results. this product needs to be a staple for life guards and ambulances and people who live at beaches... I keep mine outside and make sure people know where it is...

I gave some to the local health clinic if you need help.

remember to bring some down for your medicine assortment... it is amazing on how effective it is. this is a spray not cream, the spray gel one is also very good.

dean

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Bee, jellyfish, Man-o-war, stings ant bites, plants, urchin

Post by dean on Wed Jun 08, 2011 9:42 pm

http://chemistry.about.com/b/2011/06/01/treating-jellyfish-stings-and-man-o-war-stings.htm

http://www.wkrg.com/weather/article/400-plus-stung-by-jellyfish-on-fla.-beach/1207247/May-30-2011_12-59-pm/
Treating Jellyfish Stings and Man-o-War Stings

By Anne Marie Helmenstine, Ph.D.,

Question: How do I treat a jellyfish sting?

Answer: Act quickly and calmly to remove the tentacles, stop the stinging, and deactivate any toxin.
Here is where people get confused, because the best steps to take depend on what type of animal caused the sting. Here's a good basic strategy, especially if you don't know what caused the sting:

   Get out of the water. It's easier to deal with the sting and it takes drowning out of the equation.
   Rinse the affected area with sea water. Do not use fresh water! Fresh water will cause any stinging cells that haven't fired (called nematocysts) to do so and release their venom, possibly worsening the situation. Do not rub sand on the area (same reason).
   If you see any tentacles, carefully lift them off the skin and remove them with a stick, shell, credit card, or towel (just not your bare hand). They will stick to swimwear, so use caution touching clothing.
   Keep an eye on the victim. If you see any signs of an allergic reaction, call 911 immediately. Symptoms could include difficulty breathing, nausea, or dizziness. Some redness and swelling is normal, but if it spreads outward from the sting or if you see hives on other parts of the body, that could indicate an allergic response. If you suspect a reaction, do not hesitate to seek medical attention!
   Now... if you are sure the sting is from a jellyfish and not a Portuguese Man of War (shown below, the Man of War is not a true jellyfish) or any other animal, you can use chemistry to your advantage to inactivate the toxin, which is a protein. (Technically the venom tends to be a mixture of polypeptides and proteins including catecholamines, histamine, hyaluronidase, fibrolysins, kinins, phospholipases, and assorted toxins). How do you inactivate proteins? You can change the temperature or acidity by applying heat or an acid or base, such as vinegar or baking soda or diluted ammonia, or even an enzyme, such as the papain found in papaya and meat tenderizer. However, chemicals may cause the stinging cells to fire, which is bad news for someone allergic to jellyfish toxin or anyone stung by a Portuguese Man of War. If you do not know what caused the sting or if you suspect it is from a Man of War, do not apply fresh water or any chemical. Your best course of action is to apply heat to the affected area, since it penetrates the skin and inactivates the toxin without causing more venom to be injected. Also, heat quickly helps alleviate the pain of the sting. Hot seawater is great, but if you don't have that handy, use any warmed object.
   Some people carry aloe vera gel, Benadryl cream, or hydrocortisone cream. I'm not sure how effective the aloe is, but Benadryl is an antihistamine, which may help limit an allergic response to the sting. Hydrocortisone can help reduce inflammation. If you seek medical attention and used Benadryl or hydrocortisone, be sure to alert the medical professionals. Acetaminophen, aspirin, or ibuprofen commonly are used to relieve pain.
   The Portuguese Man-o-War or Physalia physalis is not a true jellyfish. (NOAA)

   The Portuguese Man of War (Physalia physalis) looks a lot like a jellyfish, but it is a different animal. While the blue or pink sail cannot harm you, the trailing tentacles pack a potentially-lethal sting. The tentacles can sting you even if the animal is dead.

here is the mayo clinic verifying what I said including scorpians.   They do not have man of wars but the others list it too.  

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/first-aid-insect-bites/FA00046

Bites from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets and fire ants are typically the most troublesome. Bites from mosquitoes, ticks, biting flies, ants, scorpions and some spiders also can cause reactions. Scorpion and ant bites can be very severe.
• Take an antihistamine containing diphenhydramine (Benadryl, others) or chlorpheniramine maleate (Chlor-Trimeton, others).


http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090315170352AA0FvrE

3) Benadryl is one of the faster-acting antihistamines, and is also very versatile in it's method of administration, important in severe, rapidly escalating anaphylaxis. You should carry the 25mg. gelatin-capsule form. The powder in the capsule form disperses rapidly, while the solid "caplet" takes longer to dissolve. Also, in severe cases, the sting site(s) can sometimes become extremely swollen and painful, due to a localized hyper-allergic reaction in addition to the bee venom. In this situation, if it is necessary to treat these sting site(s), an additional capsule of Benadryl can be opened up and the powder sprinkled directly on the skin at the site, and then moistened to a paste. The antihistamine is directly absorbed into the skin at the site, providing stronger local histamine blocking to the inflamed tissue. Additionally, Benadryl has (an unintentional beneficial side-effect) substantial anesthetic (pain-numbing) properties that begin to relieve local intense pain within about 30 seconds. Note: this additional topical dose of Benadryl does not need to be taken into consideration with regard to the original oral dose - it is absorbed locally and very little is absorbed into the bloodstream.

http://www.medicinenet.com/bee_sting_treatment/views.htm
1. Taking an antihistamine such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) in tablet form and/or nonprescription pain relievers such as ibuprofen oracetaminophen can also provide relief of symptoms.


http://chemistry.about.com/b/2011/06/01/treating-jellyfish-stings-and-man-o-war-stings.htm

http://www.emedicinehealth.com/jellyfish_stings/page3_em.htm

http://www.808jellyfish.com/manowartreatmentpage.htm

http://www.freemd.com/man-o-war-sting/treatment.htm


Last edited by dean on Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:43 pm; edited 4 times in total

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Re: Bee, jellyfish, Man-o-war, stings ant bites, plants, urchin

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