bank info and fideiocomiso to Banco Banorte HSCB

Go down

Identifying Genuine/Counterfeit Mexican Pesos

Post by dean on Tue May 15, 2018 1:21 pm



http://www.bajainsider.com/article/identifying-genuinecounterfeit-mexican-pesos-0#.WvcGOhVgFVk.facebook
binsider wrote:
Identifying Genuine/Counterfeit Mexican Pesos
There are a number of ways to ascertain the validity of Mexican Pesos

Identifying the security features of the Mexican Peso

A watermark is printed right into the substrata of the note's paper and is very difficult for counterfeiters to emulate successfully.

Each denomination has a fractured map of Mexico and a compass rose printed, 1/2 on each side of the note. When held up to the light the map and compass rose become complete.

A perfectly aligned hologram is another security tactic hard to duplicate

Diminishing type to a small size, but remains legible.

Diminishing type to a small size, but remains legible.
The larger notes have a security thread printed from one side to the other of the note.


Just like most other countries, you don't want to get stuck holding the bag on a bad currency note. Knowing how to quickly identify the security features of the Mexican peso can protect you from getting passed a bum bill.

Mexican Pesos from $20 pesos to the $1000 pesos note have several distinct characteristics to help you to identify genuine & counterfeit Mexican pesos. Tourists and North Americans who visit and even those that live here year round can often be easy marks for receiving short change and counterfeit pesos.

This article is compiled directly from the Bank of Mexico's page on how to identify the security measures invalid Mexican pesos. Unlike the United States, Mexico issues its own currency and the money is the property of the country of Mexico. Mexico does not borrow its money from a federal reserve bank.

I suggest if you have some Mexican pesos in your possession, take a few out and identify the security features on a bill in your hands. Once familiar with these markings you can very quickly assess the validity of notes passed to you. And purely by statistics, a few of you reading this article are going to discover some bad bills – first hand.

The Security Features of the Mexican Peso

Give it the old Touchy-Feely

There, now that you know your Mexican peso notes, let's determine how to tell the good ones from the bad ones.

The first line of defense for any monetary system is to make forgery more expensive than earning the money legitimately, and that begins with the print stock. All of the current Mexican notes are printed on a polymer paper stock blend that feels plastic like. Some of the new $20, $50 and $100 peso notes are on an entirely plastic stock.

Compare a peso to a sheet of common paper and you can tell a photocopy forgery in a spilt-second. Color photocopies make up a significant portion of the lazy man's counterfeiting. But by testing the note between your fingers for that slick feel, raised thermographic type and consistent texture, you can protect yourself from the lowest level of counterfeiting very easily.

Perfect Registration

The second tier of protection comes from the technology and skill of the money printers. Registration from one side of the note to the other can provide a quick check when holding the note up to the light. Each denomination has a fractured map of Mexico and a compass rose printed, 1/2 on each side of the note. When held up to the light the map and compass rose become complete.

The "Secret" Watermark

The third tier defense is printed right into the substrata of the note's paper and is very difficult for counterfeiters to emulate successfully. On the diagram to the right, the full image of each denomination has a red box, when held up to the light a ghosted repetition of the featured face can be seen, larger denominations also have the note's value in the watermark. The image is nearly invisible under normal lighting.

Through the Window

Smaller denomination notes also have a clear plastic window molded right into the polymer substrata. You should not be able to separate the window from the note with your fingernail. Printed into the window is a holographic design, as the note gets older these can be hard to discern. The different shape and position of the window were supposed to allow vending machines to identify note values easily.

Security Thread and RF Reflector

In the newest series of notes, it is said that the security thread is also a passive radio frequency reflector. When exposed to a specific frequency of radio waves the notes respond with a harmonic frequency. When a significant reflection is received the authorities know a large amount of cash is present. Eventually, this will be used to detect large amounts of undeclared/untaxed cash transiting borders, as it is currently used in the United States. The new Mexican border crossing at Tijuana has been equipped with this detection technology, along with several point-of-entry airports in Mexico.

The thread also allows certain commercial counting machines to detect individual bad bills and alert an operator quickly and accurately.

3D Double Sided Security Bar

The larger notes have a security thread printed from one side to the other of the note. Also in perfect registration, the security thread when held up to the light, appears perfectly complete.

This thread is part of the paper from its manufacture. It has protruding parts where you can see the figure of a snail prehispanic related to the god of the wind, Ehécatl. When the note is turned from front to back, the snail moves from left to right and when the note is rotated from left to right, the snail moves up and down. That is, it moves opposite to the movement of the note.

Color Changing Inks

Mexican currency is also imprinted with a holographic thermography which changes color when the note is angled. Shown right are the various color change makes on each denomination of the note. Along with the plastic windows on the smaller notes, I found this security feature waned as the note became old and tired, on new notes, the effect is quite pronounced. The small red box on the full notes shown right indicates the location of the special markings. The divided image is slightly raised and will change color as the note is angled left to right.

Micro Printing

The final security measure on Mexican pesos is the most difficult for counterfeiters to recreate. Microprinting is so small that lesser papers and lesser inks on a copier or regular printing press would run together in an indiscernible blob. Unless your eyes are very good or very young, it is difficult to even see the micro printing without a magnifying glass or loop. The microprinting is also done in colored layers, all tactics to make the money more difficult to print that to earn. The text also decreases in size line by line.

Black Light Analysis

The papers and inks of the notes are designed to reflect a pattern when exposed to ultra violet light. But since few of us carry a black light in our back pocket, we'll let those security descriptions await you on the Bank of Mexico website.

As a final note, I will suggest that it is important to know your own national currency as well. Counterfeit. dollars and loonies can also be found a tourist locations around the world. So know your money!

Editor's Note: Any hidden references in Mexican currency to Pink Floyd's 'Dark Side of the Moon' are purely coincidental.

dean

Posts : 4380
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Answers HSBC Fido payment info

Post by dean on Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:25 pm

bpe wrote:b. Answers HSBC Fido payment info.
(1) Jafet Uriel Peña Saldaña
ANALISTA FIDUCIARIO | HSBC México, S. A.
Av. Paseo de la Reforma 347 Col. Cuauhtémoc, C.P. 06500, México, D.F.
Phone. 57216790
Email. jafet.pena@hsbc.com.mx
When calling Jafet’s direct line from BCS, you have to dial 01 55 721 6790
Email him with your fidei number and ask for a new reference number to pay your fidei. He does not speak English but has a co-worker that has excellent English.

(2) Feb. 2018 we went to the HSBC by Walmart and showed them our last few years of payments. they took one and said it would take about an hour, so went went shopping came back and paid. Done deal.
Note: 2nd email went to HSBC Walmart and failed!! but sent this info: Per Rosa at CSL HSBC the emails for Mexico City are: “You need to send your information to this email mexico_honofid@hsbc.com.mx and Beatriz.pardo@hsbc.com.mx they are fideicomiso area”

dean

Posts : 4380
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

ATM issue los barriles

Post by dean on Mon Dec 04, 2017 11:41 am

this happened in Los Barriles

bpe wrote:a. Bancomer! I had the exact same experience with Bancomer ATM Oct 3. Asked for 7000 pesos, machine whirred and blanked out. Then I used another card to withdraw 5000 pesos from the same machine. When I returned home, I saw I had been charged for both transactions–not only that, but I was charged $755.60 for the 7000 pesos I never received! Way too much even if I’d gotten the money. Went back to the bank and was told this would clear itself up in a few days. It didn’t. I called my bank, Bank of America, but now my US bank is denying my claim. I’ve used Bancomer in Cabo and La Paz with no problems, but won’t use here again.

dean

Posts : 4380
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: bank info and fideiocomiso to Banco Banorte HSCB

Post by dean on Mon Nov 13, 2017 8:31 am

ventana view wrote:Found a simple way to pay your HSBC Fido in La Paz Write an email, using the following format, to HSBC in Mexico city, They will respond with the information so you can go to the hsbc office in La Paz. Print it, and present it to pay your bill. - Lodewijk.Kint@hitachivan
• Email To: (mexico_honofid@hsbc.com.mx>; hugo.chavez@hsbc.com.mx)
• Email Subject: Adeudo de Honorarios---#(insert your fedo number)
• Email Body: (1) "Please supply us the information so we can pay our Fido at HSBC in La Paz BCS". (2) the trust Name, (3) HSCB Trust #--------, (4) Your USA address

dean

Posts : 4380
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: bank info and fideiocomiso to Banco Banorte HSCB

Post by dean on Sun Sep 04, 2016 6:26 pm

bpe

b. Hello foreigners who own property in Baja. It’s true, some banks are getting out of the fideicomiso business and some are only getting partially out. If you are selling your property and the bank that holds your fidei will not transfer ownership, at the time of the sale you will be required to cancel your existing fidei (seller’s expense) and the buyers will have to start a new one (buyer’s expense). This can add $2,000-$3,000 total to the cost of the transaction.
Here is the current status of the major players:

HSBC
No new Fideicomisos.
Need to change banks when you transfer ownership or your existing fidei expires.

Banamex
No new Fideicomisos.
Need to change banks when you transfer ownership.
Can extend existing fidei for the original term 30 or 50 years when it expires.

Bancomer
No new Fideicomisos.
They allow assignation (Cession) of Fideicomiso rights.
Can extend existing fidei for the original term 30 or 50 years when it expires.

Banorte
No new Fideicomisos.
They allow assignation (Cession) of Fideicomiso rights.
Can extend existing fidei for the original term 30 or 50 years when it expires.

Santander
No new Fideicomisos.
They allow assignation (Cession) of Fideicomiso rights.
Can extend existing fidei for the original term 30 or 50 years when it expires.

Scotia Bank
OK

Banco del Bajio
OK

Banco Interacciones
OK

dean

Posts : 4380
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: bank info and fideiocomiso to Banco Banorte HSCB

Post by dean on Sun Aug 28, 2016 7:54 pm

HSCB/FIDO DISCUSSION.  SEND ALL FACTUAL NOTICES TO THE BPE.

BPE wrote: a.   My name is Dwnell Testa and I have just learned from my Mexico attorney that any of us with our Fideicomiso with HSBC  will need to terminate our contracts and move to a new bank as HSBC is closing this area of their bank.  They are not assigning our contracts to a new bank. They are just dissolving this part of their business. Many of us are going to have to spend thousands of dollars to fix this issue!!! I'd be curious if you have heard the same thing????

HSBC is not renewing, modifying or taking new Fidos, BUT all existing will be honored including beneficiaries.

dean

Posts : 4380
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: bank info and fideiocomiso to Banco Banorte HSCB

Post by dean on Tue Oct 14, 2014 8:18 am

BPE

a.  Bancomer Reply - We received the following information from BPE readers: Minimum balance Peso account 2000 and USD account is $200 minimum. Bancomer now charges a significant fee to receive USD wire transfers. Branch Manager at Bancomer, Los Barriles, email:miguel.mijares@bbva.com 
     If you do not have any account activity for more than 90 days your account may be blocked. I simply transfer on-line $25 from my USD to my Peso account every other month. Once blocked you must physically enter the bank to then unlock your account. I now deposit cash and or a US personal check when we first arrive. Funds by US check are available in 10 business days. Thanks Linda

dean

Posts : 4380
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Beware Bancomer fees! from LaPaz in my opinion

Post by dean on Wed Mar 19, 2014 7:02 am


We learned, as many of you did last year, that Bancomer would be introducing fees on Peso accounts if one didn't keep a minimum balance of $2000 peso's. We promptly made a deposit to equal the required amount. As snowbirds, we don't receive regular statements from Bancomer, actually often don't even receive them while here. However, I knew we had the minimum $2000 peso's in the account, so no worries. When I finally sat down to review statements, I was a little shocked to see we had a grand total of $30 peso's left in the account. It seems that the fine print in the 21 page Spanish Bancomer contract says something to the effect that the account must have a minimum AVERAGE of $2000 P every month. As we started out with $1000 P, then added another $1000 P we never exceeded the average, so they took fees of 160 P per month, plus IVA of 17.6 P per month. Then, as a final insult, they took the final 30 P and closed the account. I realize we signed a contract, and it probably is all detailed there somewhere in the fine print, but the concept of an "average" of 2000 P is a little underhanded in my opinion. (I'm trying to use moderate language here, but am actually really pissed). Especially pissed that we put $1000 P in a year ago, and it's all gone. We never actually used the account, not one withdrawal, but just had it "in case" as a matter of convenience. Bottom line, watch your Bancomer peso accounts, folks. We went to close our US$ account this morning, but they wouldn’t do it without a passport, so we simply drained the account…..left 4 peso’s that I’m sure they’ll scoop pretty quickly. 






That is why you read the contract. It is pretty standard with Bancomer.
Banorte and Banamex have no minimum balance accounts. Well they did. I am
not sure if they have them still. But I have to say if your a snow bird
check into the Capital one 360. I do a lot of banking between here and the
United States and even Canada and the fastest and cheapest way I have found
so far is Capital one 360. Charles Schwab is fine if you do not mind having
100'000 in the account at all times and live in the states full time.

dean

Posts : 4380
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

bank info and fideiocomiso to Banco Banorte HSCB

Post by dean on Sat Nov 23, 2013 8:15 am

b.  Info:  I have been paying my fideiocomiso to Banco Banorte through Jorge Pickett. He is no longer with the bank, but I do have an email address for the new Gerente Fiduciario from Banco Banorte. His name is Pablo Desiga and he is fluent in English: pablo.desiga@banorte.com.  Make sure you send him your fideiocomiso number.  Kristine B.


Last edited by dean on Sun Aug 28, 2016 7:56 pm; edited 1 time in total

dean

Posts : 4380
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: bank info and fideiocomiso to Banco Banorte HSCB

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum