rattle snake bite info and black widow and other spiders

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Re: rattle snake bite info and black widow and other spiders

Post by dean on Sun Nov 13, 2016 8:36 pm

http://www.bcsnoticias.mx/van-3-muertos-por-picadura-de-arana-violinista-en-baja-california-sur-reportan/

They are 3 killed by spider bite violinist in Baja California Sur, report

the serpentarium has the antidote, 7000 pesos.


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Re: rattle snake bite info and black widow and other spiders

Post by dean on Fri Jan 23, 2015 8:34 am

BPE

Don't pick up this pretty shell unless your certain it is vacant. From Wikipedia;
C. textile is a carnivorous species, and uses a radula (a biological microscopic needle) to inject a conotoxin to kill its prey. C. textile eats snails.[8] The proboscis, the tip of which holds the harpoon-like radular tooth, is capable of being extended to any part of its own shell. The living animal is a risk to any person handling it who has not taken proper care to protect exposed skin. Several human deaths have been attributed to this species




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snake 101

Post by dean on Tue Nov 01, 2011 12:42 pm


http://wild.enature.com/blog/how-to-avoid-and-treat-snakebites

How To Avoid Snakebites
Here are some steps you can take to avoid snakebites:

-Before venturing out into the wilderness, familiarize yourself with the snakes of your area, both venomous and non-venomous species.
-Learn which habitats the venomous species in your region are likely to be encountered in, and use caution when in those habitats.
-Always take a buddy into the field with you.
-Wear boots and loose-fitting pants if you are venturing into venomous snake territory.
-Try as much as possible not to take a snake by surprise. Stay on trails, and watch where you place your hands and feet, especially when climbing or stepping over fences, large rocks, and logs, or when collecting firewood.

How To Treat Snakebites
Despite what we often see in moves or television, venomous snakebites are rare—and if they do happen, they’re are rarely fatal to humans. Of the 8,000 snakebite victims in the United States each year, only about 10 to 15 die. However, for any snakebite the best course of action is to get medical care as soon as possible.

And unlike in movies—never try to suck the venom out of wound with your mouth. Nothing good will come of doing that. Instead, follow the steps below:

-Try to keep the snakebite victim still, as movement helps the venom spread through the body.
-Keep the injured body part motionless and just below heart level.
-Keep the victim warm, calm, and at rest, and transport him or her immediately to medical care. Do not allow him to eat or drink anything.
-If medical care is more than half an hour away, wrap a bandage a few inches above the bite, keeping it loose enough to enable blood flow (you should be able to fit a finger beneath it). Do not cut off blood flow with a tight tourniquet. Leave the bandage in place until reaching medical care.
- If you have a snakebite kit, wash the bite, and place the kit’s suction device over the bite. (Do not suck the poison out with your mouth.) Do not remove the suction device until you reach a medical facility.
- Try to identify the snake so the proper antivenin can be administered, but do not waste time or endanger yourself trying to capture or kill it.
-If you are alone and on foot, start walking slowly toward help, exerting the injured area as little as possible. If you run or if the bite has delivered a large amount of venom, you may collapse, but a snakebite seldom results in death.

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snake bite costs in the USA

Post by dean on Tue Nov 01, 2011 12:28 pm

http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/escondido/article_a81871cd-1bdf-5c06-b46a-16333883a285.html

Johnson said that while Jensen never saw the rattlesnake that bit him until it was too late, most victims see the snake first but make a wrong decision.

"They're not going to come after you," he said. "They're going to try to get away. They don't fly. They're not fast-moving. Just leaving it alone is the best thing."

Johnson said he has treated about 750 rattlesnake bites in 33 years, and he is the physician usually called to Palomar to treat bites. Johnson said about 80 percent of the victims were holding a rattlesnake when bitten.

"Don't play with snakes," he said. "They'll bite the hell out of you."

Johnson said people who are bit should call 911, elevate the wound and remove any tight-fitting clothing or jewelry because of possible swelling.

They should not ice the wound, cut it or place a tight tourniquet around it, which could lock the venom in one place and cause tissue damage.

Read more: http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/escondido/article_a81871cd-1bdf-5c06-b46a-16333883a285.html#ixzz1cU2cwvom

Treating snakebites can be expensive. Jensen was treated with 18 vials of antivenin at a cost of $5,000 each, and Johnson said the dose was not unusual. A severe bite can require 50 or 60 vials, he said.

Read more: http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/escondido/article_a81871cd-1bdf-5c06-b46a-16333883a285.html#ixzz1cU2y1FNb

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new lower cost drug being tested in US but in use in Mexico

Post by dean on Tue Nov 01, 2011 12:23 pm

new anti-venom being tested, it is made in Mexico and available in Mexico. this is the final test as others have worked out from what I can read.

http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/san-marcos/article_9cd4792e-00fe-5f05-b782-7ed881ff71d2.html

Anavip, with a larger molecular structure, may persist longer in the bloodstream.

"We hope to demonstrate that it's safe and effective and a little bit longer-lasting in the body," said Jude McNally, medical liaison for Tennessee-based Rare Disease Therapeutics, which represents the drug in the United States and is conducting the tests.

Bush said Anavip will probably cost less than CroFab, which runs nearly $2,000 per vial.

Multiple vials of antivenom are usually needed for treatment.

McNally said he could not discuss pricing.

Read more: http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/san-marcos/article_9cd4792e-00fe-5f05-b782-7ed881ff71d2.html#ixzz1cU0rRMGl

http://www.pharmacy.arizona.edu/releases/arizona-poison-drug-information-center-joins-snake-antivenom-study
Arizona Poison & Drug Information Center joins snake antivenom study

The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center is now participating in a phase III clinical trial for an investigational rattlesnake antivenom from Mexico called Anavip. The study will compare its effectiveness and safety against the currently FDA approved CroFab.

Data collected by the poison center will be part of a randomized multicenter study begun in 2008 to confirm the safety and effectiveness of the F(ab)2 antivenom Anavip. The Bioclon Institute, located in Mexico City, is the maker of the antivenom, now in use throughout Mexico, and a sponsor of the study taking place in the United States. Bioclon Institute is partnering with a U.S. company, Rare Disease Therapeutics.


Last edited by dean on Tue Nov 01, 2011 12:37 pm; edited 1 time in total

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for black widow

Post by dean on Fri Apr 08, 2011 9:31 am

if you are bitten by a black widow there is nothing the local doctors can do here you must go to lapaz if you can not drive head for the ambulance or get someone to get you to Lapaz hospital. Try to take the spider if you can even if squished.

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rattle snake bite info and black widow and other spiders

Post by dean on Thu May 28, 2009 9:04 pm

via baja western onion

Rattle Snake Bites - I have lived in Baja California for 39 years and I have only heard of three people being bitten by a rattle snake. All survived.
We have tried to get antivenom to keep at our ranch but have been told that the untrained application of antivenom can result in fatal overdose, that it needs to be applied by an experienced person who can determine the type of antivenom and the amount that needs to be applied. I was told to try to capture the snake and bring it along with the patient to the medical facility so that the health care worker can determine what type of rattlesnake it is and the amount of antivenom to be applied. Bites are not usually immediately fatal so the patient does have time to get to a hospital.
A few years ago someone in Todos Santos was bitten and went to La Paz but could not find antivenom. He then drove to Cabo to Amerimed and found the care he needed. It is my understanding that they have a supply of antivenom on hand. Before you go call to make sure and let them know you are on your way so they can be prepared.
Below are some suggestions of what to do if you are bitten.
When a bite occurs, the amount of venom injected cannot be gauged easily. Symptoms and swelling may occur quickly, and may cause death easily but in some cases hours may pass before serious effects appear.
Experienced health workers typically gauge envenomation in stages ranging from 0, when there is no evident venom, to 5, when there is a life-threatening amount of venom present. The stages reflect the amount of bruising and swelling around the fang marks and the speed with which that bruising and swelling progresses. In more severe envenomation cases (stage 4 or 5) there may also be proximal symptoms, such as lip-tingling, dizziness, bleeding, vomiting, or shock. Difficulty breathing, paralysis, drooling, and massive hemorrhaging are also common symptoms.
Quick medical attention is critical, and treatment typically requires antivenin/antivenom to block the tissue destruction, nerve effects, and blood-clotting disorders common with rattlesnake venom. Most medical experts recommend keeping the area of the bite below the level of the heart. It is important to keep a snake bite victim calm in order to avoid elevating their heart rate and accelerating the circulation of venom within the body. Untrained individuals should not attempt to make incisions at or around bite sites, or to use tourniquets, as either treatment may be more destructive than the envenomation itself.
At our ranch we keep peacocks, roadrunners and chickens to keep snakes away from living areas. Peacocks are especially effective. - Elena , e@elenamoreno.com, 61


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Re: rattle snake bite info and black widow and other spiders

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