solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Page 1 of 3 1, 2, 3  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Wed Aug 24, 2016 8:50 pm

http://newatlas.com/solar-thermal-record-anu/45027/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=810b6d4543-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-810b6d4543-90245106

Solar thermal record sees 97% conversion of sunlight into steam

Australian scientists are no strangers to world records for solar power. Back in 2014, the CSIRO created supercritical steam at the highest temperature and pressure, and in May this year, engineers at UNSW achieved 34.5 percent efficiency in directly converting sunlight to electricity. Now, scientists at the Australian National University (ANU) have managed a new record of 97 percent efficiency for converting sunlight into steam.

Unlike photovoltaic solar panels, which absorb sunlight and directly convert it into electricity, concentrating solar power (CSP) systems reflect sunlight from a wide area and focus it in on a small receiver. As that receiver heats up, water inside turns into steam, which drives a turbine to generate electricity. Rather than storing that power in potentially costly batteries, the thermal energy is stored in molten salts, so that water can be added to create steam (and subsequently electricity) long after the sun's gone down.

The so-called Big Dish at ANU is made up of a concave surface of reflectors, directing sunlight to a receiver suspended at the focal point. A new receiver for the dish, designed and built by the team, was responsible for halving previous losses and achieving the 97 percent conversion.

"When our computer model told us the efficiency that our design was going to achieve, we thought it was alarmingly high," says Dr John Pye, from the ANU Research School of Engineering. "But when we built it and tested it, sure enough, the performance was amazing."

The team describes its receiver design as resembling a top hat, with a wide brim running around the bottom of a narrower cavity that extends upwards. The dish reflects sunlight onto water pipes that wrap around the bottom of the receiver's brim and up into the cavity, heating the water to 500º C (932º F) and turning it into steam. To minimize heat loss, the steam hits that peak temperature at the deepest part of the cavity, so that any heat that is lost can feed back into the pipes around the brim.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Thu Aug 04, 2016 9:18 am




http://newatlas.com/offshore-floating-wind-farm/44739/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=3d42ceaa57-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-3d42ceaa57-90245106

California's central coast could become the site of the world's largest working offshore wind farm, a 765-megawatt producer surpassing the 630-megawatt London Array off the coast of Kent. If built, the Trident Winds energy project would include around 100 wind turbines set on floating platforms 33 miles (53 km) from shore and power more than 200,000 homes.

Each of the 100 turbines would produce more than 6 megawatts of electricity, powered by average wind speeds of 8.5 meters/sec (19 mph) for a nameplate capacity of 765 MW and a net capacity of 650 MW. The turbines would be anchored in 2,600 to 3,300 ft (800 to 1,000 m) of deep water using vertical load, drag embedded or torpedo anchors, depending on the seabed conditions. No pilings are required and the installation is reversible, meaning nothing would be left on the seabed if or when the project is decommissioned.

To reduce or eliminate wind shadow effects, the turbines would be placed 3,300 ft (1,000 m) apart, and connected electrically with inter-array cables. The produced energy would be sent to a floating substation which then delivers the combined payload to shore through a redundant system of export cables.

Most of the world's offshore wind farms are in waters less than 200 ft (61 m) deep, and sit on platforms attached to the seabed with concrete or steel pilings. Floating wind turbines use cables attached to their anchors, and to date are only found in test projects, such as Statoil's Hywind pilot park off the coast of Scotland.

But more than 60 percent of the best wind sources in the US, as determined by wind speed, duration and timing, are within 50 nautical miles (92.6 km) of the coasts, in waters typically too deep for traditional wind energy systems. And while it's cheaper and easier to install floating wind turbines – just tow and anchor – they're more expensive than fixed-platform turbines because their anchoring systems require more steel and need longer power cables to run electricity to shore. It's estimated that by 2020, floating wind turbines will cost around $9 million per megawatt compared to $4 million per megawatt for conventional, fixed-platform turbines. The hope is that as floating wind turbine technology matures, its costs will eventually come down.

Besides the issue of turbulent seas and harsh deep water conditions that could damage the turbines, the proposed location for the Trident Winds energy project is also prime migration ground for a number of whale species, so the platform cables could become an entanglement risk for the animals.

But the Trident group is so far undeterred, and is aiming for construction to begin in 2021 with a completion target of 2025. It also times well with the state's new law requiring half its energy to come from renewable sources by 2030.

A 30-megawatt wind farm is currently being constructed off Rhode Island to serve the needs of energy-challenged Block Island, but this would be the first major offshore wind farm in the US. It would be especially significant for California, which has some of the most stringent coastal development regulations in the world. Trident would work with the coastal city of Morro Bay, which closed its conventional 650-watt power plant in 2013.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Mon Aug 01, 2016 1:29 pm

http://newatlas.com/deep-water-desalination/44662/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=a87edf1f0b-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-a87edf1f0b-90245106

Desalination plant would go deep to protect marine life

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

solar reflective AC/dehumidification

Post by dean on Tue Jun 21, 2016 8:16 pm

boy would this be ideal in LaPaz.



http://www.gizmag.com/solar-thermal-energy-cooling-csiro/43908/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=27b1801442-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-27b1801442-90245106

Solar-powered air-con uses heat to cool shopping center

Solar-concentrating thermal technology is being used to power the air-conditioning system of an entire shopping center in Australia solely from the rays of the sun. With around 60 percent of all energy used in shopping centers being consumed by heating and cooling needs, the new system could lead the way to significant power and cost savings in a range of large commercial spaces.

Installed in the Stockland Wendouree Shopping Centre in Ballarat, Victoria, the prototype system was developed by the CSIRO and partly funded by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) program, which aims to increase the supply and competitiveness of renewable energy in Australia. The same program helped support the CSIRO's world-record breaking solar-powered supercritical steam generator.

The new solar-powered system is a "closed-loop" air-conditioner, meaning it heats and cools air within the building without introducing any external air into the system, with a pair of "desiccant" (drying) wheels acting as dehumidifiers to remove moisture from the air. These operate at separate temperatures; the high-temperature wheel uses the captured solar energy for regeneration of the low temperature wheel, which operates without any external heat at all.

"CSIRO's energy research is driving down costs of renewable technologies, accelerating the transition to a lower-emissions future," said CSIRO Energy Director Peter Mayfield. "We are pioneering new technologies and this project is a world-first demonstration of a desiccant air-conditioning system using roof mounted concentrating solar thermal collectors."

The air conditioning system uses trough collectors to capture solar heat of around 150 to 200° C (302 to 392° F) and then store it in a 2,000-liter (528-US gal) thermal oil tank. Utilizing a heat cascading design, heat from the tank is used to heat the center's ambient air in the winter and power an indirect evaporative cooler to cool the center in summer. So compact is the system, that the whole solar air-conditioning unit is some 40 percent smaller than a comparable standard single-stage desiccant system.

The researchers believe that solar heat-driven desiccant air conditioning systems have the potential to significantly reduce the electric power requirements and costs related to supplying humidity controlled fresh air in large commercial spaces.

The team at the CSIRO intend to spend the next 12 months monitoring and assessing the new system and gauge its capabilities in a commercial environment. These observations will add to the long-term goal of the CSIRO to help contribute to a low- emissions future. ARENA contributed AUD$520,000 (US$386,000) to the project, with the remainder of the AUD$1.2 million (US$890,000) being provided jointly by the CSIRO and the Stockland Group using technology from NEP Solar.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

solar reflective AC

Post by dean on Tue Jun 21, 2016 8:13 pm



http://www.gizmag.com/solar-thermal-energy-cooling-csiro/43908/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=27b1801442-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-27b1801442-90245106

Solar-powered air-con uses heat to cool shopping center

Solar-concentrating thermal technology is being used to power the air-conditioning system of an entire shopping center in Australia solely from the rays of the sun. With around 60 percent of all energy used in shopping centers being consumed by heating and cooling needs, the new system could lead the way to significant power and cost savings in a range of large commercial spaces.

Installed in the Stockland Wendouree Shopping Centre in Ballarat, Victoria, the prototype system was developed by the CSIRO and partly funded by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) program, which aims to increase the supply and competitiveness of renewable energy in Australia. The same program helped support the CSIRO's world-record breaking solar-powered supercritical steam generator.

The new solar-powered system is a "closed-loop" air-conditioner, meaning it heats and cools air within the building without introducing any external air into the system, with a pair of "desiccant" (drying) wheels acting as dehumidifiers to remove moisture from the air. These operate at separate temperatures; the high-temperature wheel uses the captured solar energy for regeneration of the low temperature wheel, which operates without any external heat at all.

"CSIRO's energy research is driving down costs of renewable technologies, accelerating the transition to a lower-emissions future," said CSIRO Energy Director Peter Mayfield. "We are pioneering new technologies and this project is a world-first demonstration of a desiccant air-conditioning system using roof mounted concentrating solar thermal collectors."

The air conditioning system uses trough collectors to capture solar heat of around 150 to 200° C (302 to 392° F) and then store it in a 2,000-liter (528-US gal) thermal oil tank. Utilizing a heat cascading design, heat from the tank is used to heat the center's ambient air in the winter and power an indirect evaporative cooler to cool the center in summer. So compact is the system, that the whole solar air-conditioning unit is some 40 percent smaller than a comparable standard single-stage desiccant system.

The researchers believe that solar heat-driven desiccant air conditioning systems have the potential to significantly reduce the electric power requirements and costs related to supplying humidity controlled fresh air in large commercial spaces.

The team at the CSIRO intend to spend the next 12 months monitoring and assessing the new system and gauge its capabilities in a commercial environment. These observations will add to the long-term goal of the CSIRO to help contribute to a low- emissions future. ARENA contributed AUD$520,000 (US$386,000) to the project, with the remainder of the AUD$1.2 million (US$890,000) being provided jointly by the CSIRO and the Stockland Group using technology from NEP Solar.


dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

solar farm still not running after hurricane Odile in LaPaz.

Post by dean on Tue Apr 26, 2016 12:25 pm

solar farm still not running after hurricane Odile in LaPaz.  appears the company owns it.

http://www.bcsnoticias.mx/el-parque-solar-mas-grande-de-america-que-inauguro-pena-nieto-en-la-paz-ya-no-funciona/




This work, considered the largest and most important in the energy sector of the country and Latin America, was inaugurated by President Enrique Peña Nieto , on March 26, 2014; and which it belongs to the Spanish company Energy Gauss: Solar Aura , made ​​with the integration of 132,000 polycrystalline modules with followers shaft and a useful life of 30 years will generate 82 gigawatt hours (GWh) per year.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Wed Nov 11, 2015 4:54 am

Lapaz shopping mall 90% of its electricity will be solar shortly. translated by google... but 8 year payback is amazing.  It also provides shade for parking...   


http://www.bcsnoticias.mx/plaza-comercial-en-la-paz-instala-792-paneles-solares-produciran-el-90-de-su-energia/

Shopping plaza in La Paz installed 792 solar panels; They produce 90% of its energy








Claudia Aviles



La Paz, Baja California Sur (BCS).  In the parking lot of the Plaza Paseo La Paz, a steel frame is constructed with 792 solar panels, which will help save 8,000 trees per year and save 90% of energy consumed in the place where bill currently about 2 million pesos a year for this concept; managing to be the first sustainable State Plaza; and he was announced Errejón Francisco Bulnes , director of World Durable in  BCS , company that won the tender for this project.

"The company, Arco Group , who owns the place, did not skimp on investing to build this structure consisting of 792 solar panels 1 by 1.70 meters each brand Solar World , which is the best and the most expensive world; which will represent a saving of 90% of energy consumed, as are paid monthly average of 120 to 140,000 pesos , and year are almost 2 million pesos.

The money for this project is estimated to recover in eight years, and which had an investment of nearly 10 million, to which only 7.5 million were spent on panels and 2 million in the steel structure, which is anti hurricanes ensuring that any panel is apparent with these natural phenomena. "

World Durable director, said that the energy you save will only used in public areas such as parking, lighting, air conditioners, and all electricity is part of the property, and will not be the they spend the tenants of the place.
Francisco Bulnes Errejón explained that each solar panel will produce 250 watts per hour, in an approximately 7 hours per day, which is the average time that can capture solar radiation, and in total will be 200 kilowatts of power per hour for the 792 panels ; Solar energy is converted into electricity by means of investors, which goes to the property, and that is not consumed, it is protected by the CFE .

"With these amounts, in addition to cost savings, it was able to reduce the pollution generated by the production of energy by burning fuel oil; and also to save 8,000 trees a year that are used for this process. "
Errejón Bulnes said that this system "is guaranteed for 25 years and 40 years of life," and that will be the first green or sustainable place in the state, since there are none in BCS that produces clean energy or generate their own electricity .

Moreover, the company had the option of placing the system on the roof of the square, but "decided to risk and invest more with a double purpose, saving energy and provide users more convenience with the shadows cast by the structure" he stressed.

Finally, for this project, with a duration of 3 months, 30 direct jobs were offered, all of the workers from La Paz; He added that it will be in early December, when the Governor of BCS , Carlos Mendoza Davis, along with the delegate of the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) in BCS, executives of Arco Group and World Durable officially inaugurate that work.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Fri Nov 06, 2015 6:25 am

Concentrated solar thermal power plants, such as this one in the California Mojave Desert, could soon form a part of the smart grid thanks to a system developed at OSU


http://www.gizmag.com/thermochemical-energy-storage/40235/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=9475727729-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-9475727729-90245106





The intermittent nature of renewable energy sources is a huge burden on the power grid, making flexible and economical energy storage an essential step to a greener future. Researchers at Oregon State University (OSU) and the University of Florida have now devised a way to conveniently store and release energy harvested through concentrated solar power (CSP) plants, improving on the cost and energy density of previous systems and preparing this technology for the smart grid.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

back up batteries

Post by dean on Mon Oct 05, 2015 8:39 pm

http://cleantechnica.com/2015/10/05/cleantechnica-exclusive-simpliphi-power-brings-game-changing-battery-tech-residential-storage/?utm_source=Cleantechnica+News&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=988c336501-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_b9b83ee7eb-988c336501-332019637

[size=39]CleanTechnica Exclusive: SimpliPhi Power Brings Game-Changing Battery Tech To Residential Storage[/size]


We recently covered SimpliPhi Power’s history, levelized cost of energy (LCOE) figures, and the exciting automated home it enabled in New York. We ran into the company again at Solar Power International last month and arranged for a visit to its corporate HQ in Ojai, California, to sit down with CEO Catherine Von Burg and CTO Stuart Lennox for a deeper dive.
For those unfamiliar with SimpliPhi, what sets its solutions apart vs other residential storage units is that they not only raise the performance bar in almost every category but their battery chemistry is also better for the environment. Specifically, SimpliPhi Power products use a lithium-ferro-phosphate (LFP) chemistry that brings the benefits and energy density of conventional lithium-ion batteries without the cobalt. SimpliPhi’s proprietary architecture and battery management pulls this chemistry together in a unit that’s 98% efficient — setting the performance bar for the residential storage market.
What’s even better is that the modules run at this efficiency while offering a full depth of discharge (up to 100%!) without the thermal runaway issues of most lithium-ion packs. Why do Teslas need a titanium shield on the underbody and a complex heat management system? To protect the precious battery cells from physical damage, which could trigger thermal runaway. Conversely, SimpliPhi’s units are stuffed into sealed boxes and shipped all around the world by the military for (ab)use in some of the world’s harshest and hottest climates. What’s fantastic is that they do this without a perceptible heat signature.
http://simpliphipower.com/


SAFE





  • No risk of thermal runaway or fire
  • Operate within a range of -4F to 140F
  • SimpliPhi products do not require ventilation or toxic liquid cooling to prevent heat build-up or thermal runaway, a characteristic of other lithium ion and cobalt-based batteries




EFFICIENT & DURABLE





  • Operate at 98% efficiency for 5,000+ cycles for the OES line of stationary batteries and 2,500-5,000 cycles for the portable LibertyPak plug-and-play products, many times the cycle life of lithium cobalt-based batteries
  • Allow daily cycles over 10-year warranty period (compared to one cycle per week for
    other lithium-based batteries)
  • Product life expectancy of 15-20 years
  • 1/5th the operating cost per kWh over warranty period vs. other lithium-based systems




dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Mon Sep 21, 2015 10:16 pm

when it finally hits pricing like this it will be ideal for baja homes too with their home module.

http://cleantechnica.com/2015/09/21/tesla-gigafactory-battery-improvements-could-cut-battery-costs-70/?utm_source=Cleantechnica+News&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=7268b7c9d5-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_b9b83ee7eb-7268b7c9d5-332019637

The analyst in question is basing this prediction around an estimation that current Model S battery-pack costs hover somewhere around $250/kWh (kilowatt-hour) — and that the company “can bring the cost of the battery cells down to ~$88/kWh and the pack-level cost to ~$38/kWh.”
Here’s a clip from that:
We believe that Tesla’s use of an efficient nickel cobalt aluminum (NCA) cathode (ie the positive electrode), use of a silicon synthetic graphene anode (ie the negative electrode) that has 2-6x the lithium-ion storage capacity of today’s standard graphite anode, and a possible use of water-based anode solvent, are key advantages. […] Our analysis details a potential path to a 30% cell-level cost reduction to ~$88/kWh by using a more efficient lithium-rich nickel cobalt manganese cathode (vs. NCA), doubling the percentage of silicon in the synthetic graphene anode, replacing the liquid electrolyte with an ionic gel electrolyte which eliminates the need for a separator, and using a water-based electrode solvent for the cathode. The Gigafactory, which is expected to begin production in early ’16, should drive down pack-level costs by 70% to ~$38/kWh via economies of scale, supply chain optimization, increased automation, and production domestication.
As noted by Electrek, that puts things in the sorts of ranges that would probably allow for a very affordable electric vehicle (EV) with a 200–300 mile plus range.
With regard to the estimation that Tesla Model S battery packs cost around $250/kWh at the moment, it should probably be noted here that the company’s Powerpacks are currently selling for around that price — so, presumably it’s a bit lower, but that’s just a guess. Other estimates put Tesla’s battery packs at a cost of ~$200/kWh right now. 

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

solar desalination

Post by dean on Mon Jul 20, 2015 7:41 pm

http://cleantechnica.com/2015/07/20/buzz-gets-bigger-tiny-california-solar-desalination-plant/?utm_source=Cleantechnica+News&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=a002b73ec7-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_b9b83ee7eb-a002b73ec7-332019637

What a difference a month makes. Back in June, the California Farm Bureau Federation reported that local officials were still a bit iffy over the prospects for scaling up a relatively small, demonstration-scale solar desalination plant for the water-starved San Joaquin Valley. We have no idea what changed their minds, but just last week the desalination plant’s developer, WaterFX, announced plans for bouncing the project up to a commercial-scale facility capable of producing 1.6 billion gallons of fresh water per year.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Wed Jun 10, 2015 4:53 am

http://cleantechnica.com/2015/06/09/cheap-michigan-wind-energy-set-save-consumers-15-million-annually/?utm_source=Cleantechnica+News&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=99d0d5f7d3-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_b9b83ee7eb-99d0d5f7d3-332019637

Cheap Michigan Wind Revs An Economic Engine

Declining wind energy costs aren’t limited to Michigan, even if the state is seeing better-than-average cost reductions. A 2014 report from the Department of Energy found certain power purchase agreements (PPAs) for wind energy were clocking in at $25 per megawatt-hour (MWh), and the US Energy Information Administration just projected wind power would be cheaper (on average) than any other type of generation except the most efficient natural gas technology by 2020. (Of course, that doesn’t take into account the extra costs of natural gas known as “externalities.”)

That trend is clear in Michigan. Earlier this year, the state PSC reported the cost of wind power in Michigan had fallen by half since 2008 to half the price of coal at $47–$53 per MWh of generation. North American Windpower cites recent in-state wind contracts at $43 per MWh, both significantly lower than coal and nuclear, which range between $108–$133 per MWh.

But best of all, wind power has been an economic driver in the state. The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) reported 1.5 gigawatts (GW) total capacity installed in Michigan at the end of 2014. DTE noted the economic impact of its 1 GW wind capacity in the regulatory filing, saying “these projects have created about 1,400 jobs across Michigan, primarily in the construction sector.”

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Like shale oil, solar power is shaking up global energy

Post by dean on Sun Apr 26, 2015 11:43 pm

http://news.yahoo.com/shale-oil-solar-power-shaking-global-energy-010214565.html


In Japan, residential solar power production costs have more than halved since 2010 to under 30 yen ($0.25) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), making it comparable to average household electricity prices.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Silent rooftop wind turbines

Post by dean on Fri Apr 17, 2015 7:12 pm

http://www.treehugger.com/wind-technology/silent-wind-turbines-could-generate-half-household-energy.html 




Small wind turbines scaled to the right size for residential and urban areas have so far lived in the shadows of their larger wind-farm-sized counterparts. The power output has been too low for a reasonable return on investment through energy savings and the noise they produce is louder than most homeowners can deal with.
A Dutch renewable energy start-up called The Archimedes is working to solve both of those problems in a new class of small-scale wind turbine -- one that is almost silent and is far more efficient at converting wind into energy. The company states that the Liam F1 turbine could generate 1,500 kWh of energy per year at wind speeds of 5m/s, enough to cover half of an average household's energy use.
When used in combination with rooftop solar panels, a house could run off grid. "When there is wind you use the energy produced by the wind turbine; when the sun is shining you use the solar cells to produce the energy," The Archimedes CEO Richard Ruijtenbeek said.
The Liam's blades are shaped like a Nautilus shell. The design allows it to point into the wind to capture the most amount of energy, while also producing very little sound. The inventor of the turbine Marinus Mieremet says that the power output is 80 percent of the theoretical maximum energy that could be harnessed from the wind.
“Generally speaking, there is a difference in pressure in front and behind of the rotor blades of a windmill. However, this is not the case with the Liam F1. The difference in pressure is created by the spatial figure in the spiral blade. This results in a much better performance. Even when the wind is blowing at an angle of 60 degrees into the rotor, it will start to spin. We do not require expensive software: because of its conical shape, the wind turbine yaws itself automatically into the optimal wind direction. Just like a wind vane. And because the wind turbine encounters minimal resistance, he is virtually silent," said Mieremet.
The company is also working on even smaller wind turbine designs that could fit on LED lampposts to power them, on boats or in smaller bodies of water.
You can watch a video about the history of the Liam turbine from invention to field tests below.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Thu Apr 16, 2015 7:51 pm

they have solved the bird death issues with the concentrated solar plants



http://cleantechnica.com/2015/04/16/one-weird-trick-prevents-bird-deaths-solar-towers/


America’s second solar power tower, the 110 MW Crescent Dunes project, the first US power tower to include storage, has been undergoing final commissioning (testing) at Tonopah in Nevada, where it will supply power for Las Vegas till midnight.

So SolarReserve is putting the thousands of heliostats (mirrors) through their paces to make sure everything works.

One of the tests is of standby position. (Standby is when the heliostats are waiting to go to work making electricity by focusing on the tower receiver. During standby they are not aimed at the tower receiver, but somewhere in the air.)

How not to focus heliostats

Originally, the standby position was to create a tight circle of solar flux you can actually see above the tower.

But when the engineers focused 3,000 heliostats there on January 14th, 115 birds were killed as they flew through the concentrated solar flux at the focal point where all the reflections met.

According to the compliance report filed by Stantec with regulators as required by the BLM:

“Approximately 3,000 heliostats were staged in a position which reflected light and heat to a concentrated point above the central tower. A halo above the tower was visible from the ground (Figure 1). The heat was so intense that birds flying into the halo were immediately burned and smoke was clearly evident. Approximately 115 mortalities were noted between 11:15 AM and 3:30 PM. Appropriate agencies, including BLM, were notified of the situation around 12:27 PM when bird mortalities associated with the halo were confirmed.”

SolarReserve shut down the test and brainstormed how to solve the problem to reduce solar flux in standby position. The engineering team recalibrated the standby algorithm and the next day they put this into effect. Their new algorithm was designed so that no more than four ‘suns’ would hit any one focal point during standby.

“The difficulty is that that was a concentrated solar energy in that area above the tower,” SolarReserve CEO Kevin Smith told me this week.

“So what we did is we spread them over a several hundred meters of a  sort of ‘pancake’ shape so any one point is safe for birds — it’s 4 suns or less.”

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Portland to generate electricity within its own water pipes

Post by dean on Wed Mar 04, 2015 11:09 pm

http://www.gizmag.com/portland-lucidpipe-power-system/36130/

There's a lot of water constantly moving through the municipal pipelines of most major cities. While the water itself is already destined for various uses, why not harness its flow to produce hydroelectric power? Well, that's exactly what Lucid Energy's LucidPipe Power System does, and Portland, Oregon has just become the latest city to adopt it.

LucidPipe simply replaces a stretch of existing gravity-fed conventional pipeline, that's used for transporting potable water. As the water flows through, it spins four 42-inch (107-cm) turbines, each one of which is hooked up to a generator on the outside of the pipe. The presence of the turbines reportedly doesn't slow the water's flow rate significantly, so there's virtually no impact on pipeline efficiency.

A diagram of the system (Image: Lucid Energy)
The 200-kW Portland system was privately financed by Harbourton Alternative Energy, and its installation was completed late last December. It's now undergoing reliability and efficiency testing, which includes checking that its sensors and smart control system are working properly. It's scheduled to begin full capacity power generation by March.

Once up and running, it's expected to generate an average of 1,100 megawatt hours of energy per year, which is enough to power approximately 150 homes. Over the next 20 years, it should also generate about US$2 million in energy sales to Portland General Electric, which Harbourton plans on sharing with the City of Portland and the Portland Water Bureau in order to offset operational costs. At the end of that period, the Portland Water Bureau will have the right to purchase the system outright, along with all the energy it produces.

For now, the new LucidPipe Power System is the only one in Portland. If it proves successful, however, others may follow. A previously-installed system has been providing power in Riverside, California since 2012.

If you like the basic idea behind the technology, there are smaller similar systems that can be installed within your own home. The Pluvia generates electricity from the flow of rainwater off of rooftops, while the H2O Power radio runs on electricity generated by the flow of shower water.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

World's largest solar plant opens in California desert

Post by dean on Wed Feb 11, 2015 6:45 am

this would be about the size needed for baja sur to remove 90% ofthe fuel oil burnered in LaPaz area for Lapaz Residents, for entire baja covering cabo  my GUESSS is double that.  

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/02/10/worlds-largest-solar-plant-california-riverside-county/23159235/
http://cleantechnica.com/2015/02/10/550-mw-desert-sunlight-solar-farm-california-now-online/?utm_source=Cleantechnica+News&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=4d638b8b4f-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_b9b83ee7eb-4d638b8b4f-332019637
World's largest solar plant opens in California desert

The Southern California desert is now home to the world's largest solar power plant.


U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell joined state officials on Monday to open the 550-megawatt Desert Sunlight solar project in the town of Desert Center, Calif., near Joshua Tree National Park. Built by First Solar, the project generates enough electricity to power 160,000 average California homes.

Desert Sunlight received a federal loan of nearly $1.5 billion, and Jewell called its completion an example of the loan guarantee program's tremendous importance.

"When you are stepping out with new technology, when you are trying something that has been untested before, a loan guarantee program from an organization like the Department of Energy is what provides you, as a lender, that certainty that you can step up and support the project," Jewell told The Desert Sun.

Conservative lawmakers have derided the loan guarantee program, arguing that it's wasted billions of taxpayer dollars. Critics have pointed to the program's $535 million loan guarantee for Solyndra, a Fremont-based solar panel manufacturer that filed for bankruptcy in 2011.

But the Department of Energy reported last year that it expects to make a profit of $5 billion to $6 billion from the program. The department funded five traditional, large-scale solar farms, and Desert Sunlight marks the last of those projects to go online.

"They're all rock-solid, money is good, living up to every kind of condition we put in the loan documents in terms of performance, in terms of commercial operation," Peter Davidson, executive director of the Department of Energy's loan programs office, said in an interview last week.

The loan guarantee program did more than fund five solar photovoltaic projects, Davidson added: It helped launch the large-scale solar industry. In 2009, there were no traditional solar farms in the United States larger than 100 megawatts. Now, 17 such projects have been financed, according to a Department of Energy report released Monday.

Solar panels "existed before as a technology, but that technology hadn't been deployed at a large scale," Davidson said. "Once we've done that, the government steps aside to let the private markets take over."

Desert Sunlight employed an average of 440 people during more than three years of construction, and it now has about 15 full-time employees. Money provided by the project's owners — as part of an agreement negotiated with Riverside County — is also being used to fund $400,000 in improvements to the community center in nearby Desert Center.

"The debate's over — we're going to be moving to more renewable energy," Riverside County Supervisor John Benoit said.

Power from the plant will go to Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas & Electric Co.

CALIFORNIA BEAMIN'

Desert Sunlight is the world's largest solar power plant, although only by a hair.

The Topaz solar project in San Luis Obispo County, Calif. — which, like Desert Sunlight, was built by Arizona-based First Solar — also has a capacity of 550 megawatts. But the desert has more abundant sunlight than San Luis Obispo County, so Desert Sunlight will actually generate more electricity than Topaz, said Georges Antoun, First Solar's chief operating officer.

"It's a beautiful sun here, year-round," he said.

California as a whole has installed more renewable energy than any other state, noted David Hochschild, a member of the California Energy Commission.

"There were a lot of skeptics who actually didn't believe that renewables could scale, that this cost reduction could happen, that we could introduce it to the grid," Hochschild said. "They've been proven wrong."

desert sunlight solar farm 4.JPG
U.S. Department of Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, right, and Georges Antoun, COO of First Solar, tour the 550-megawatt Desert Sunlight Solar Farm near Desert Center on Monday. (Photo: Jay Calderon/The Desert Sun)
There's little doubt that California will get more electricity from clean energy in the coming years. The state's three major utilities are on track to meet or exceed a 33% renewable energy mandate by 2020, and Gov. Jerry Brown is calling for policymakers to increase that target to 50% by 2030.

It's an open question, though, whether future solar projects will be anywhere near as big as Desert Sunlight.

Developers have been gravitating toward smaller solar farms, which are easier to build and usually have a smaller impact on species and ecosystems in California's deserts. Desert Sunlight spans 3,800 acres near Joshua Tree National Park, and it faced vehement opposition from environmental activists during its permitting process.

If legislators adopt a 50% renewable energy mandate, it could incentivize massive projects like Desert Sunlight. But Antoun said he'd be surprised to see many more projects 550 megawatts or larger, in California or elsewhere.

"Can we create a bigger project? Of course," he said. "But it all has to do with how much appetite (states) have for how much land to utilize, and to be committed for 20-25 years."

Utilities faced with renewable energy mandates, Antoun said, will more likely turn to projects in the 100-megawatt range, located closer to energy consumers. Projects built near cities require far less transmission infrastructure, which is expensive to build and poses a host of environmental concerns.

http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-14.pdf

Households and Families: 2010
2010 Census Briefs
By
Daphne Lofquist,
Terry Lugaila,
Martin O’Connell,
and
Sarah Feliz
INTRODUCTION
Households and Families: 2010
2010 Census Briefs

The 2010 Census enumerated 308.7
million people in the United States,
a 9.7 percent increase from 281.4
million in Census 2000. Of the total
population in 2010, 300.8 million
lived in 116.7 million households
for an average of 2.58 people per
household. This was down from an
average of 2.59 in 2000 when 273.6
million people lived in 105.5 million
households. The remaining 8.0 million
people in 2010 lived in group-quarters
arrangements such as school dormitories,
nursing homes, or military barracks.
This report presents information on the
number and types of living arrangements
of American households in 2010 derived
from the relations

http://www.firstsolar.com/en/about-us/projects/desert-sunlight-solar-farm/

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/02/10/apple-848-million-solar-farm-first-solar-tim-cook/23192299/
SAN FRANCISCO — Solar is sizzling hot, and it's all thanks to Apple CEO Tim Cook.

Cook on Tuesday announced Apple's "biggest and boldest project ever," a partnership with First Solar to build an $848 million, 1,300-acre solar plant in Monterey County.

The plant will power Apple's new headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., its data center in Newark, Calif., and all Apple offices and 52 Apple stores in California, resulting in significant energy cost savings for Apple, Cook said in remarks at the Goldman Sachs Technology and Internet Conference in San Francisco.

"We know at Apple that climate change is real. Our view is that the time for talk is past, and the time for action is now," Cook said.

The solar project is part of the California Flats project on Hearst's 73,000-acre Jack Ranch in Monterey County and may be one of the largest ever built for a commercial user. It will add 130 megawatts of new solar power to California, enough to power about 50,000 California homes.​

First Solar FSLR shares rallied on the news that came on the heels of the opening of the world's largest solar power plant in Southern California. First Solar closed up nearly 5% to $48.54 and rose again after-hours trading.

U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell joined state officials on Monday to open the 550-megawatt Desert Sunlight solar project in the town of Desert Center, Calif., near Joshua Tree National Park. Built by First Solar, the project generates enough electricity to power 160,000 average California homes.

Apple's announcement was praised by Greenpeace.

"It's one thing to talk about being 100% renewably powered, but it's quite another thing to make good on that commitment with the incredible speed and integrity that Apple has shown in the past two years," Greenpeace Senior IT Sector Analyst Gary Cook said in a statement.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Caribbean Island Ditching Diesel In Favor Of Renewable Energ

Post by dean on Fri Jan 09, 2015 9:16 am

Caribbean Island Ditching Diesel In Favor Of Renewable Energy

http://cleantechnica.com/2015/01/09/caribbean-island-ditching-diesel-favor-renewable-energy/?utm_source=Cleantechnica+News&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=26ebfdb510-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_b9b83ee7eb-26ebfdb510-332019637

Bonaire’s Electricity System Transformation

The result is a transformed electricity system on Bonaire. The island is now home to 12 wind turbines with a total of 11 MW of wind power capacity, which contribute up to 90 percent of the island’s electricity at times of peak wind, and 40–45 percent of its annual electricity on average. Battery storage (6 MWh) is included in order to take advantage of available power in times of excess wind, and provide that stored electricity in times of low wind. The battery also boosts the reliability of the overall system—it is capable of providing 3 MW for over two minutes, allowing time for additional generation to be started when there is a sudden drop in wind.

The Bonaire system also includes 14 MW of diesel generation, five total generators, which provide the necessary power to meet the load when there is not enough wind power available. The generators are equipped to run on both traditional diesel as well as biodiesel. The next steps in the island’s energy transformation involve using local algae resources, grown in the large salt flats on the island, to create biofuel, which can then be used in the existing generators. This will allow Bonaire to operate a 100 percent renewable electricity system—with on average 40–45 percent from wind and 55–60 percent from biodiesel.

The new electricity system led to more reliable electricity, more employment opportunities, reduced dependence on oil (and its fluctuating prices), and a reduction in electricity bills. Bonaire residents currently pay $0.22/kWh for electricity, much lower than prices on other nearby Caribbean islands, which are often $0.36/kWh or above. When oil prices spiked in 2008, while Bonaire was still using temporary diesel generators before making its transition to renewables, electricity prices on the island reached $0.50/kWh. The new electricity system also created jobs for the construction and ongoing operation of the wind farm, and for research and development of algae production capabilities and conversion to biofuel. Additional employment opportunities will be created for continuing algae production and operation of the biodiesel plant.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Wed Dec 24, 2014 8:38 am

http://www.gizmag.com/needbased-taoshouse/35338/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=ab7177f69a-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-ab7177f69a-90245106


A home built in New Mexico, US, is expected to run entirely from the electricity generated from energy harvested by its nine 230 W solar panels. The Taoshouse also has a number of design features to help keep power usage to a minimum.

The Taoshouse uses nine 230 W photovoltaic panels to harvest solar energyThe Taoshouse covers a total area of 2,870 sq ft (267 sq m)The outdoor area of the TaoshouseThe Taoshouse uses passive shading to keep itself coolView all
Like the Active House prototype in Missouri, US, the Taoshouse is designed to look and feel like a normal home and not some futuristic box. Located in a senior co-housing community in the town of Taos, the Taoshouse has a clean interior aesthetic with plaster walls and floor-to-ceiling bamboo casement work. Both projects show the potential for net-zero energy housing.

Project designer Needbased says that part of the brief for the Taoshouse design was to ensure that it would achieve Passive House Certification and meet the highest level of the National Association of House Builders (NAHB) green building standard. According to Needbased, the house has achieved both of these goals and, as such, is one of only a handful of North American buildings to be certified by the Passive House Institute in Germany.

The Taoshouse kitchen
The Taoshouse has an internal area of 1,632 sq ft (152 sq m) and covers a total area of 2,870 sq ft (267 sq m). It can pull electricity from the grid if needs be, or feed any surplus back into the grid. To date, the home has had an energy usage of 1.87 kWh / sq ft (20.13 kWh / sq m).

"Over the past ten months since the project was completed, the house has used 3,100 kWh and generated 2,800 kWh," Jonah Stanford of Needbased tells Gizmag. "The first year of energy use is expected to be higher than the norm due to the latent energy of the moisture of all the building materials used. I expect the overall energy use to come down slightly after the building has fully dried out."

The house is kept cool using passive shading and night-sky cooling. In order to minimize heat loss, it is highly insulated in the walls, under slab and roof and employs high performance Zola windows.

An energy recovery ventilator is used to condition incoming air with air that is being exhausted from the building. This means incoming air can be warmed and dehumidified, for example. An underfloor hydronic radiant system, meanwhile, is used to heat the building.

The Taoshouse was completed earlier this year.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Desolenator churns out clean drinking water using solar powe

Post by dean on Sat Dec 20, 2014 9:20 am

need a few gallons of drinking water a day?

Desolenator churns out clean drinking water using solar power
http://www.gizmag.com/desolenator-clean-drinking-water-power-sun/35299/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=ad1ad2a180-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-ad1ad2a180-90245106



Desalination may one day prove the savior for regions of the world where clean drinking water is scarce, but current technology dictates that this process is often expensive and energy-intensive. The team behind the Desolenator has high hopes of delivering water security to those in need, with a mobile desalinator that runs purely on energy from the sun.

At a time when the planet’s population is set to grow substantially and rising global temperatures are adding further uncertainty to the supply of fresh water, considerable effort is going into advancing desalination technology and making it cheaper and more accessible.

In 2010, IBM commenced work on a solar-powered desalination plant to bring fresh water to the Saudi desert, while later in that same year MIT revealed designs for a portable system powered by photovoltaic panels. Only yesterday we wrote about the Odyssée desalinator, an all-in-one system that uses wave-power to produce clean drinking water on the spot.

Now the developers of the Desolenator are promising the lowest cost per liter compared to any other available system of its scale. Their solution takes the form of a mobile, flat-screen television-sized unit with a top, slanted surface covered by an array on photovoltaic panels. Complete with all terrain wheels for mobility, the team says that the Desolenator is built to last 20 years.

The device is claimed to be more dependable than traditional desalination systems that rely on reverse osmosis, a technique where specialized membranes are used to filter out undesired particles. Part of this is because it has no moving parts, but more importantly, it is entirely energy independent.

Speaking to BBC Radio last week, Desolenator founder and CEO William Janssen detailed how the system works. While photovoltaic panels are used to convert sunlight into electricity, his design focuses a little more on the heat that they provide instead. "What we did is we actually insulated the solar panel, we put double glazing on the top and we put foam all around, so the solar panel would get even hotter," said Janssen.

After bumping up the temperature of the panels, a thin film of water is then run across its surface to soak up the heat. This heated water is then directed to a separate vessel where the electricity that is generated by the system is used to bring it to boiling point with a spiral heater. This creates vapor which is collected and distilled into clean water. Janssen says in its current form, the system can provide around 15 L (3.96 gal) of water per day.

Janssen’s team has a functioning prototype and is now looking to raise US$150,000 on Indiegogo. Funds will be directed toward building more units for testing, fine-tuning the final design and ultimately mass production. Early pledges of $450 are available and will have a Desolenator sent your way in October 2015 if the campaign runs as planned.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Fri Dec 05, 2014 3:23 pm

http://www.gizmag.com/tulip-concentrating-solar-power-ethiopia/35076/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=9475a95342-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-9475a95342-90245106

Tulip solar power system gets its first commercial application

By Ben Coxworth

December 4, 2014


For five years now, a Tulip concentrating solar power plant has been operating at a kibbutz in Israel. In January 2012, a second one sprouted in Spain. While both plants have been successfully pumping out electricity ever since, they were also both built as research and development exercises. Soon, however, the world's first commercial Tulip plant will be built for a paying client, in Ethiopia.

Created by Israeli company AORA, the Tulip system is certainly unique. It incorporates a central tulip-like tower, surrounded by an array of sun-tracking mirrors on the ground. Those mirrors turn to track with the sun, reflecting and concentrating its rays onto the tower’s top-mounted "bulb" throughout the day. This causes the air inside the bulb to heat to temperatures as high as 1,000ºC (1,832ºF). That ultra-hot air is then used to run a turbine generator, thus creating electricity.

At night or in cloudy weather, the plant's generator can also run on fuels such as diesel or natural gas, allowing it to supply electricity 24 hours a day.

The system incorporates a central tulip-like tower, surrounded by an array of sun-tracking...
The new plant is being built for the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Energy of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, as part of that country's Climate-Resilient Green Economy Strategy. It will have an output capacity of 100kW of electricity along with 170kW of thermal power, while occupying less than 3,500 sq m (37,673 sq ft) of space.

Additionally, unlike some other concentrating solar power systems, Tulips don't require water as a heat-carrying medium or for cooling. This is an important consideration for a partially-arid country such as Ethiopia.

Construction on the new Tulip is scheduled to begin next year. Assuming it performs well during its trial period, plans call for a series of other plants to then be built in underserved off-grid locations across the country. All of them will be run by local people, who have been trained by AORA staff.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Can Solar Thermal Desalination Make Sustainable Agriculture

Post by dean on Fri Dec 05, 2014 11:19 am

http://cleantechnica.com/2014/12/05/can-solar-thermal-desalination-make-sustainable-agriculture-possible/?utm_source=Cleantechnica+News&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=7f3c3816fb-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_b9b83ee7eb-7f3c3816fb-332019637

Can Solar Thermal Desalination Make Sustainable Agriculture Possible?

December 5th, 2014 by Leon Kaye

The jury is still out on solar thermal, which is certainly efficient but has its critics because of its costs, both financial and ecological. The International Energy Association (IEA) is still bullish about its future, and projects such as the Solana Generating Station in Arizona show potential. Large projects such as Masdar’s Shams 1 and California’s Ivanpah have scored plenty of attention, but the rapidly decreasing price of solar panels has made PV more attractive for large projects. But solar thermal technology could have promise for agriculture. At a time when many are pondering how we are going to feed nine billion people by 2050, new projects underway are leveraging solar thermal desalination technology to cleanse water and grow crops in water-stressed regions.

Sundrop Farms, based in Port Augusta, Australia, believes it has a solution. The company claims it is the only such company in the world that can build and operate greenhouses in areas that severely lack fresh water, arable land, or access to the electrical grid. In order to bring food closer to cities, “Sundrop Systems” turn energy from the sun and seawater into freshwater for irrigation, power for greenhouses and climate control to heat and cool crops as needed. Nutrients that end up as by-products from the desalination process can also be converted into fertilizer that in turn can be used within the greenhouse. In a way, one could describe this as a closed-loop system for growing food. The ability to grow food in places like brownfield sites or in areas where the climate is too harsh for agriculture, or even horticulture, could make this a more sustainable way to produce food—if it can become cost competitive. Sundrop Farms and its main investor, the American private equity firm KKR, have not publicly revealed any figures about the cost of these projects or whether they seek financial incentives from local governments.

Sundrop Farms, KKR, Australia, solar thermal, agriculture, farming, desalination, solar desalination, Port Augusta

Nevertheless, as more countries and municipalities consider desalination to meet their ever-growing water needs, alternatives to current desalination technologies are needed. Desalination using conventional fossil fuels leaves its own sizable carbon footprint, and the process is also expensive and leaves municipalities and businesses vulnerable to volatile prices. Solar desalination shows some promise, but is still several years off from becoming truly scalable. But Sundrop Farms’ application for farms could have potential.

Port Augusta, located in an arid region in South Australia, could become the perfect laboratory exploring solar thermal’s viability for agriculture. The town receives only about 10 inches of water (25 cm) of water annually—much of Australia has suffered even more as the country has coped with severe droughts for several years. Sundrop Farms and KKR are investing in a 20 hectare (49 acres) facility that will produce 15 million kilograms (33 million pounds) of vegetables and other tomatoes—which both companies say will produce 100 more times food than the current greenhouse onsite. According to a Factiva search, 11,000 parabolic mirrors will redirect sunlight on a 115 meter (327 feet) tall tower, which in turn will create steam that will power turbines and then provide energy for the mega-greenhouse. The project also promises 200 jobs, a solid economic boost in this town of 13,000 people.

If the project succeeds, Sundrop Farms has its crosshairs on new markets in the United States and Middle East. With the growing mantra to “buy local” catching on in the U.S.—often in communities where large-scale agriculture is not possible—do not be surprised if this is a technology we see in more cities in a decade. And as California and other states cope with an extended drought, seawater will take a more active role in irrigation with freshwater and groundwater supplies close to being tapped out.

A similar solar thermal project launched earlier this year in another water-stressed region. WaterFX, a California start-up, has built a solar thermal-powered desalination plant in the San Joaquin Valley that cleans saline drainage water and turns into freshwater for irrigation. The 6,500 square foot facility can produce eight gallons of safe and clean water a minute, and plans are underway to expand the plant so it can produce 2,200 acre-feet of water annually. Pilot programs are also on the drawing board in Chile, which is also has a large agricultural sector and has its own water challenges.

With 70 to 80 percent of the world’s freshwater devoted to farming, society will have to make some tough choices in the coming decades as we use water faster than it can be replenished. Technologies coming from companies such as Sundrop Farms at the very least will motivate other clean technology entrepreneurs to find new ways to harvest water and grow crops for an ever more crowded world—sustainably.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

about solar in baja CFE thread.

Post by dean on Sat Nov 29, 2014 9:24 pm

about solar in baja CFE thread...

http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=76544

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

other energy saving products

Post by dean on Wed Nov 26, 2014 8:53 am

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200627186_200627186
Comfort Plus Sun Control Window Film — 36in.W x 15ft.L

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

What’s Cheaper: Solar Hot Water Systems Or Solar PV?

Post by dean on Wed Nov 26, 2014 4:04 am

http://cleantechnica.com/2014/11/25/solar-hot-water-panels-vs-solar-pv-whats-cheaper/?utm_source=Cleantechnica+News&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=cacb8be9a1-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_b9b83ee7eb-cacb8be9a1-332019637
What’s Cheaper: Solar Hot Water Systems Or Solar PV?

November 25th, 2014 by James Ayre

If you were asked whether solar hot water systems or solar PV systems were more economical at heating water, what would you say?

Your first guess would probably be that solar hot water systems were more economical, right?

Well, it turns out that maybe they aren’t (most of the time, anyways), according to a recent study. The study is coming to us via the Queensland PV company Ecoelectric, though, so it’s worth taking this with a grain of salt and perhaps digging in more to the assumptions used. Nonetheless, if you’ve previously written off the potential of heating your water with solar PV, it seems this is worth reconsidering.

The analysis suggests that solar PV systems are more economical than solar hot water systems or heat pump and gas systems — in addition to being cheaper with regard to initial costs.

“The analysis also finds that hot water green schemes, including solar hot water system rebates and water pumping rebates, could have little effect on closing the gap between the total cost of traditional renewable water heating methods and the much lower cost of using Solar PV,” RenewEconomy writes.

“According to Ecoelectric – which bills itself as a leading specialist in solar power and hybrid battery systems – a solar PV water heating system would require no additional installation other than a timer, which tells the hot water system to run during day light hours. The hot water is then powered by the sun.”

The company’s blog post on the subject (found here), provides a fairly detailed explanation of the methodology used. The blog notes the conclusions of the analysis thusly: “As you can see, the combination of a trusty old storage system with solar PV is EXTREMELY cost effective. In fact if you already have storage you would be crazy to change to anything else. If you’re looking at a new build you may be slightly better off with solar hot water, but it’s so close as to be almost negligible.”

Goes to show how quickly the solar PV sector is changing. The rapid fall in solar PV prices has hurt fossil fuels (while benefiting the solar installation industry and the public at large), but it has also cost several cleantech companies their lives.

Image Credit: Ecoelectric

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Mon Oct 20, 2014 7:35 am

http://www.pv-tech.org/news/california_continues_solar_lead_as_34mw_solar_power_plant_nears_completion


US independent power producer, Sustainable Power Group (sPower) has completed a 34MW solar power plant in California.
The plant was developed in partnership with Chinese module supplier, JinkoSolar.
The 34MW solar power plant is located in Antelope Valley, California – the leading US solar state.
“The abundance of solar energy in California makes PV modules the ideal solution to fulfill local electricity needs,” said Nigel Cockroft, general manager, JinkoSolar.
The 34MW of generation capacity from the solar plant will be sold by sPower to the predominant electricity supplier for the south of California, Southern California Edison, via a 20 year Power Purchase Agreement.
Engineering, procurement and construction was carried out by commercial construction services, Swinerton builders.
George Hershman, Swinerton Renewable Energy vice president and division manager said the companies share a “commitment to delivering economical and responsible clean energy to rate payers".
The plant is scheduled to begin operations on 30 November this year with 115,000 of JinkoSolar’s 305W panels.
The 34MW plant is split into four projects across Lancaster and Victorville in California and will power more than 4,000 homes a year in the state.  
“The development of these projects has brought jobs and economic benefits to the Antelope Valley, while providing a sustainable future in the area," said sPower CEO, Ryan Creamer.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Sun Oct 12, 2014 9:00 am

interesting ac units  claim to be part solar to save 30-50 percent of the cooling costs.  


 http://www.globalmarket.com/product-info/solar-air-conditioner-8304131.html?utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter1&utm_campaign=flagship&entityId=101451454&recId=630903019&entityType=1&xIndex=1&token=b45fac2d720a9bf9a2307ce4b4124045&userId=101451454&edmpid=5438dd83fa2e440370efdfe81465&utm_term=3281341&yIndex=1&gmedm=0213|3281341

hybrid solar absorption air conditioner
 
 1. running principle
Chuanglan hybrid solar air-conditioner is driven by electricity and with solar energy as an auxiliary power. The two kinds of energy work complementally in accordance with principles of fluid dynamics. It combines the absorption working system to compression system by using environmental-friendly media in cooling and heating on the basic of traditional air-conditioner technology to achieve energy-saving and environment protection.
  

http://www.globalmarket.com/product-info/led-display-solar-air-conditioner-8490939.html?utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter1&utm_campaign=flagship&entityId=101451454&recId=630903019&entityType=1&xIndex=1&token=b45fac2d720a9bf9a2307ce4b4124045&userId=101451454&edmpid=5438dd83fa2e440370efdfe81465&utm_term=3281341&yIndex=2&gmedm=0213|3281341


dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

IBM "sunflowers" to supply off-grid energy, water, and cooli

Post by dean on Thu Oct 09, 2014 10:52 am

IBM "sunflowers" to supply off-grid energy, water, and cooling


http://www.gizmag.com/ibm-sunflower-hcpvt-pv-thermal-solar-concentrator/33989/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=8908a96810-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-8908a96810-90245106


Looking rather like a 10-meter (33 ft) tall sunflower, IBM's High Concentration PhotoVoltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system concentrates the sun’s radiation over 2,000 times on a single point and then transforms 80 percent of that into usable energy. Using a number of liquid-cooled microchannel receivers, each equipped with an array of multi-junction photovoltaic chips, each HCPVT can produce enough power, water, and cooling to supply several homes.



"The direct cooling technology with very small pumping power used to cool the photovoltaic chips with water is inspired by the hierarchical branched blood supply system of the human body," said Dr. Bruno Michel, manager, advanced thermal packaging at IBM Research.
The HCPVT system can also be adapted to use the cooling system to provide drinkable water and air conditioning from the hot water output produced. Salt water is passed through the heating conduits before being run through a permeable membrane distillation system, where it is then evaporated and desalinated. To produce cool air for the home, the waste heat can be run through an adsorption chiller, which is an evaporator/condenser heat exchanger that uses water, rather than other chemicals, as the refrigerant medium.





dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

400Wp modules at US$0.40/W

Post by dean on Thu Oct 02, 2014 6:41 am

http://www.pv-tech.org/news/sunedison_expects_new_fbr_polysilicon_process_to_provide_400wp_modules_at_u

SunEdison expects new FBR polysilicon process to provide 400Wp modules at US$0.40/W

  •  
    "Solar energy is at a transformational moment in time and innovative technology is what will power that transformation," said Ahmad Chatila, Chief Executive Officer of SunEdison. "Our latest advance is a leap forward in solar technology and will enable solar power to become the lowest cost energy solution - not just an alternative to other renewables, but the cost-winner over fossil fuels as well."



SunEdison said that its high pressure fluidized bed reactor (HP-FBR) technology being ramped at its new joint venture facility in Korea will provide source polysilicon to enable 400 watt peak PV panel performance at a cost of US$0.40 per watt peak by 2016.
The HP-FBR technology developed by SunEdison is claimed to produce high purity polysilicon 10 times more efficiently than standard Siemens processes, while requiring 90% less energy consumption. 
  

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Wed Oct 01, 2014 9:17 pm

http://cleantechnica.com/wind-energy-facts/


dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

NextEra Energy, First Solar begin work on 250MW Nevada plant

Post by dean on Tue Sep 09, 2014 10:10 am

NextEra Energy, First Solar begin work on 250MW Nevada plant


http://www.pv-tech.org/news/nextera_energy_first_solar_begin_work_on_250mw_nevada_plant


Electric power generator NextEra Energy Resources and PV systems provider First Solar have begun construction on a 250MW PV plant on the border of California and Nevada.
The Silver State South Solar Project –- which will be built in Primm, Nevada -- will be located about 40 miles south of Las Vegas and will be placed next to an existing power plant and transmission line corridor.
Armando Pimentel, president and chief executive officer of NextEra Energy Resources, said: “Renewable energy sources such as solar power play an important role in the future energy mix in this county. We look forward to working with First Solar and Southern California Edison to make this project a reality.”
A NextEra subsidiary will own and operate the plant, which will generate power that will be given to state utility Southern California Edison as part of a long-term agreement.

Once completed in early 2016, the plant is expected to create enough clean solar energy to power 80,000 homes annually while displacing around 150,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Rooftop solar cheaper than coal, says Philippines’ energy mi

Post by dean on Mon Sep 08, 2014 6:00 am

Rooftop solar cheaper than coal, says Philippines’ energy minister
http://www.pv-tech.org/news/rooftop_solar_cheaper_than_coal_says_philippines_energy_secretary


The Philippines’ secretary of energy, Carlos Jericho Petilla said 5 September that rooftop solar is cheaper than coal in the island state.
The country relies on importing most of its energy from expensive fossil fuels, subject to price fluctuations. Electricity from a coal plant cost up to PHP5.50 per kWh (US$0.13) plus PHP6.50 (US$0.15) for distribution and transmission, totalling PHP12.00 (US$0.28). Whereas, rooftop solar costs PHP9.00 per kWh (US$0.21) for generation. There are no costs for distribution or transmission, said Petilla.
“This already saves you up to PHP3 per kWh (US$0.07),” Petilla said.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

How California could power itself using nothing but renewabl

Post by dean on Thu Aug 07, 2014 10:05 pm

[size=38]How California could power itself using nothing but renewables[/size]
http://theweek.com/article/index/265874/how-california-could-power-itself-using-nothing-but-renewables


Jacobson’s team calculated that their California plan would create hundreds of thousands more jobs than it would sacrifice, and it would annually save more than 10,000 lives and $100 billion in health care costs (expenses which are now generated by pollution). The 603 gigawatts of new renewable energy facilities would cost $1.1 trillion, but those costs would be more than offset through climate benefits and fuel savings.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

CSP plants could run at 80 percent capacity (or better) thro

Post by dean on Wed Jun 25, 2014 6:03 am

http://www.gizmag.com/concentrating-solar-power/32678/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=8f51c3045b-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-8f51c3045b-90245106


CSP plants could run at 80 percent capacity (or better) throughout the year

Researchers at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) have conducted a study to examine the potential for solar power to provide reliable electricity around the clock, every day of the year. The team found that a large, distributed network of concentrated solar power (CSP) plants in the Mediterranean basin or the Kalahari desert in southern Africa would be able to consistently run at 80 percent of maximum capacity or more throughout the year regardless of time of day, season, or weather conditions.
The potential to generate solar power in the Earth's deserts is essentially unlimited: there is more than enough land area to generate far more electricity than the whole world currently demands.
And yet, generating such vast amounts of power using photovoltaic (PV) cells would be unpractical, mainly because PV panels can't produce electricity at night, and are also subject to changing seasons and weather conditions. A power grid relying mostly on PV panels would need a very large number of batteries, which would drive electricity costs up.







This is the first detailed study of its kind to establish that it is indeed possible to build a power grid which relies primarily on solar energy and still provides reliable electricity around the clock, day at night, and throughout the year. Moreover, the costs per kWh might start dropping dramatically over the next few years.

"The costs of CSP, even in their least cost configuration, are currently higher than gas (roughly 10 cents per kWh, compared to about 5 cents)," Patt told us. "But that will almost certainly change if CSP becomes more mainstream, and it is reasonable to imagine that it will be as cheap as gas within the next 10 to 15 years. In a sense, our latest results provide a reason for energy system planners to push CSP to the point where this [cost reduction] will happen."

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Fri Jun 20, 2014 5:32 pm

http://www.cliquesolar.com/ARUN160.aspx

The ARUN® solar thermal concentrator is a Fresnel Paraboloid Solar Concentrator System with a Point Focus based on assembly of reflectors. ARUN® uses solar grade mirrors as reflectors. The system automatically tracks the sun from morning to evening using a proprietary electronic tracking system. The receiver is placed at the focus of the paraboloid concentrator. It is an inverted cavity type receiver with MS tubing as per the required pressure. ARUN® design integrates the latest technologies for complete automated operations with minimum maintenance with all built in safety provisions as well as two axes tracking of the Sun.


Key Performance Figures (per day) 

ey Performance Figures (per day) 
ApplicationARUN®160
Dry saturated steam1200 kg
Hot water (@ 65°C)25,000 liters
Cooling (for 8-10 hours)25 TR
Cooking7,500 meals
Milk pasteurization30,000 liters
Effluent evaporation2.5m3
Laundry600 kg
Desalination5.75m3


Savings by 1 ARUN® dish on a clear sunny day
ParameterARUN®160
Daily energy output7 Lac kcal
Effective saving of fuel100 liters
Effective saving of electrical energy800 kWh

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Wed May 28, 2014 5:05 am

http://www.gizmag.com/the-archimedes-liam-f1-urban-wind-turbine/32263/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=431f8de56f-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-431f8de56f-90245106


Although it's getting increasingly common to see solar panels on the roofs of homes, household wind turbines are still a fairly rare sight. If Rotterdam-based tech firm The Archimedes has its way, however, that will soon change. Today the company officially introduced its Liam F1 Urban Wind Turbine, which is said to have an energy yield that is "80 percent of the maximum that is theoretically feasible." That's quite the assertion, given that most conventional wind turbines average around 25 to 50 percent.
The 75-kg (165-lb) 1.5-meter (5-ft)-wide Liam obviously doesn't look much like a typical turbine. It draws on the form of the nautilus shell, and the screw pump invented by ancient Greek mathematician Archimedes of Syracuse.
That form factor reportedly results in minimal mechanical resistance, allowing it to spin very freely and to operate quietly – blade noise is one of the common complaints regarding rooftop wind turbines. Additionally, the design is claimed to keep it always pointing into the wind for maximum yield.


dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Fri May 23, 2014 1:59 pm

http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/05/f15/2014_csp_report.pdf

report on concentrating solar plants.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

automated cleaning of solar panels without water.

Post by dean on Tue Apr 01, 2014 11:45 am

http://www.gizmag.com/ecoppia-e4-ketura-sun/31428/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=d0cb89be9a-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-d0cb89be9a-90245106

automated cleaning of solar panels without water.

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by dean on Thu Feb 27, 2014 9:43 am

http://www.trust.org/item/20140225084556-9gted


The mayor of this sunny state capital, Esthela Ponce, says the Mexican president is expected to pay an inaugural visit to the solar farm soon, ushering in a new era of renewable energy for La Paz and the rest of the country.
Built on the site of an abandoned agricultural operation, the solar farm is linked via a high-voltage transmission line with the local-area power grid at the Olas Altas substation 3 km to the south, to which it began supplying power in September.
Aura Solar I is Mexico’s premiere utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) power producer, as well as the first domestic private enterprise of its size to obtain both a development bank loan and an agreement to sell its electricity to the grid.
“The idea is to see how this type of merchant-risk deal can be replicated down the road, not only in Mexico and Latin America, but around the world,” said Hector Olea, president and CEO of Gauss Energía, the construction contractor for the project.
The $100 million installation of nearly 132,000 solar-panel modules on 100 hectares has the capacity to generate 30 megawatts (MW) of electricity - enough for 164,000 people, or 65 percent of La Paz households, year-round.
It is expected to replace output from local fossil-fuel facilities, reducing emissions of carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide, sulfur oxide and particulates. In all, it will cut greenhouse gas emissions by 60,000 tonnes a year, according to the World Bank Group’s International Financing Company (IFC).

dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Desert plants to be put to the test for aviation biofuel pro

Post by dean on Mon Jan 27, 2014 8:42 am

http://www.gizmag.com/halophyte-aviation-biofuel-desert-plants/30583/

Desert plants to be put to the test for aviation biofuel production


The Salicornia is one species of halophyte that is a promising feedstock for biofuel produ...
The Salicornia is one species of halophyte that is a promising feedstock for biofuel production (Photo: SBRC)
Image Gallery (2 images)
Whenever the topic of plant-derived biofuels is raised, the issue of turning valuable arable land over to the task of growing feedstock is generally not far behind. A discovery by the Sustainable Bioenergy Research Consortium (SRBC) that desert plants fed by seawater can produce biofuel more efficiently than other well-known feedstocks could help alleviate such concerns.

The SRBC, which is affiliated with the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology in Abu Dhabi, is receiving funding from Boeing, Etihad Airways and Honeywell UOP to develop and commercialize a sustainable biofuel that emits 50 to 80 percent less carbon through its lifecycle than fossil fuels. Plants called halophytes, which are highly salt tolerant, could be the answer.

SRBC researchers found that halophyte seeds contain oil suitable for biofuel production and that the entire shrub-like plant can be turned into biofuel more effectively than many other feedstocks.

The pilot project that will test the potential of halophytes for biofuel production (Image...
To test their findings, the SRBC team will create a test ecosystem over the coming year that will see two crops of halophytes planted in the sandy soil found in Abu Dhabi. The test site will use waste seawater from a fish and shrimp farm to nourish the plants, with the water then flowing into a field of mangroves before being returned to the ocean.

"The UAE has become a leader in researching desert land and seawater to grow sustainable biofuel feedstocks, which has potential applications in other parts of the world," says Dr. Alejandro Rios, Director of the SBRC. "This project can have a global impact, since 97 percent of the earth’s water is ocean and 20 percent of the earth’s land is desert."


dean

Posts : 3762
Join date : 2008-01-01

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: solar updates reflective and PV for the world

Post by Sponsored content Today at 7:34 am


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 3 1, 2, 3  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum